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Exploring the Way the Women are Portrayed in Romeo and Juliet

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Introduction

Exploring the way in which the women are portrayed in Romeo and Juliet The main female roles in Romeo and Juliet are: Lady Montague, Lady Capulet, the Nurse, Juliet and Rosaline. They are all portrayed in different ways and they are each from different classes. Lady Capulet, Lady Montague Lady Montague is Romeo's mother and is married to Montague. She has a good lifestyle as she is the top of the top, in Verona, in the Montague family. In Act 1 Scene 1, she seems to mock her husband when he wants to go out into the battle, "Thou shall not stir one foot to seek a foe." By doing this she seems to be a character who is in control of Montague as she can say things like that to him in private. She never seems to speak in public, which shows her to be a quiet character who is being kept under control by Montague. Lady Capulet is Juliet's mother and is Capulet's wife. Lady Capulet, herself married young, she is eager to see her daughter marry Paris. She is an ineffectual mother, relying on the Nurse for moral and practical support. She also mocks her husband in Act 1 Scene 1 when he wants to go and fight the Montague's, "A crutch, a crutch! Why call you for a sword?" She agrees with Capulet and never argues with him or disagrees. ...read more.

Middle

The Nurse, at times, appears to be the most sympathetic character in the play. But for all her friendliness, and her close relationship with Juliet, her advice to marry Paris seems like a cold-blooded act of betrayal. This ultimately leaves Juliet feeling lonely. This shows that the Nurse believes Juliet should marry Paris and it leaves Juliet feeling betrayed. "NURSE ...An eagle, madam, Hath not so green, so quick, so fair an eye, As Paris hath. Beshrew my very heart, I think you are happy in this second match, For it excels your first, or if it did not, Your first is dead, or 'twere as good he were As living here and you no use of him. JULIET Speak'st thou from thy heart? NURSE And from my soul too, else beshrew them both." Juliet is the daughter of Capulet and Lady Capulet. She starts off as a beautiful na�ve fourteen year old. She has thought little about love and marriage, but she grows up quickly upon falling in love with Romeo, the son of her family's great enemy: "My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen and unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me, That I must love a loath�d enemy." The quote shows how much Juliet feels for Romeo, it shows that she knows he is the family's great enemy but it does not make any difference to her. ...read more.

Conclusion

They are ornaments. They can not speak their mind openly and nor can they make their own decisions. The women are in the men's shadows. Juliet is a strong character who sticks up for what she wants in life, even if she would lose her family name and status. She loves Romeo and wants to be with him so that's what she is going to do. She defies her parents by arranging the marriage to Romeo. Juliet begins the play as an innocent, sweet fourteen year old who does not show any interest in marriage nor love, but when she meets Romeo she grows up quickly and has an interest in love and marriage. This shows her maturity and how she is becoming like her mother and father. She is a strong character and she makes her own choices and does whatever she wants to do even if her parents disapprove. Both Lady Capulet and Lady Montague have a lot in common, they both want all the brawls and conflicts to stop in Verona. They are both the leading ladies of Verona and want to live in peace. Their husbands seem to think they are the strongest characters but in fact the women are stronger as the men are under their thumbs. The women have all been portrayed as dependent characters, but in fact they have inner strength and are a lot cleverer in the subtle ways that make them seem superior to the men. ?? ?? ?? ?? Romeo And Juliet Coursework Lynzi Best 11.2 ...read more.

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