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The Irony and Puns in the Changeling Reveal the Characters actions are prompted by an Individual Sexual Drive though they are often unconscious of the fact .- How far do you agree with this Review?

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Introduction

"The Irony and Puns in the Changeling Reveal the Characters actions are prompted by an Individual Sexual Drive though they are often unconscious of the fact ."- How far do you agree with this Review? Throughout 'The Changeling' Middleton and Rowley create characters that are driven by calculated sexual desire. Having no outlet for their passion causes our protagonists to unconsciously shift their frustration in the direction which may, to be euphemistic, provide relief. There is a duplicity to much of the dialogue and the exchanges which take place within the play and many literal meanings have bawdy undertones conveying the subconscious preoccupations of the central characters. One area where individual sexual drive is evident is in the sphere of relationships where love and sexuality are often conflated. Alsemero speaks of love " as firm as love e'er built upon", the biological undertones of this reflect his attitude to Beatrice, as his love is founded upon a mere glimpse of her in the temple .

Middle

But unlike the other characters it seems that De Flores simply equates love with the lasciviousness and is not a victim of a powerful unconscious sexual drive. In one of the first scenes with De Flores and before love is even mentioned on his part he reveals that his subsequent actions are motivated by the pursuit of Beatrice, saying "Some twenty times a day, nay, not so little, Do I force errands, frame ways and excuses To come into her sight". In his manipulation of Beatrice he bluntly makes his expectations clear saying "Is anything valued too precious for my recompense?" and "Justice invites your blood to understand me". The reference to blood is implicitly sexual, but at the same time seems to equate justice with sacrifice on the part of Isabella. At the same time De Flores seems to be saying that the murder has made them equals and her noble blood no longer places her above him.

Conclusion

that "All this while you have but played the fool" and seeming disinterested in his advances, just as with Lollio to whom she says "Sirrah, no more!". Her observation that a woman "need not gad abroad to seek her sin" is a reassertion of the fact that whilst she is aware of the potential and opportunity open to her to transgress she has no intention of doing so, due to her recognition of her own personal dignity and self-worth. Within "The Changeling" there are multiple layers of sexual self-awareness within the characters with instances of both conscious and unconscious passion driving the events. However, it is only the shrewder and more discerning of the characters such as De Flores, Lollio and Isabella who are able to identify their feelings and thereby fathom both their own actions and the events unfurling around them. Parallel to this, the likes of Beatrice are swept up by their subconscious urges and driven into precarious and threatening situations, stemming from their repression of self-discovery.

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