• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Focusing On a Clockwork Orange and Frankenstein compare some of the ways authors explore the idea of what it means to be an outcast.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Focusing On a Clockwork Orange and Frankenstein compare some of the ways authors explore the idea of what it means to be an outcast. Within both A clockwork orange and Frankenstein many themes and motifs are highlighted and in many cases aid to construct the structure of the two novels. One aspect of these motifs is the idealism of an outcast. This is structured differently however in both novels and is explored in both similar and different ways. Because an outcast is defined as a person who is not accepted in society or a group, It is quite easy to portray this in both novels because of the fact people can become outcasts because of their beliefs, the differences in appearance and possibly because of a group of different people it is a common factor amongst all societies, it is possibly a sign of fear or maybe even variation in levels of racism or acceptance criteria into society. People often create outcasts because of the inability to work around either differences or the naivety or better suited the ignorance of individuality; these are all active in both A Clockwork Orange and Frankenstein. Starting with an analysis of Frankenstein and continuing to compare with A Clockwork Orange the ideas of an outcast shall be discussed thoroughly from multiple viewpoints so to access the methods used by the authors. ...read more.

Middle

Alex being sent to prison was a way to improve the quickly decreasing safety and standards of life in the public sector, with his 'gang' being separated and later it is shown they are converted to help the government, a completely totalitarian state, and improve things in that society. This dramatically shows an idea of an outcast in Alex, who after being in charge of his 'droogs' at one time has been thrown violently from his perch of superiority and almost tyrannical charge and into a stat where he is being fully controlled beyond his free-will. Although the same doesn't quite appear in Frankenstein, the monster has to redevelop into his own segregated world to cope without coming into human contact, this being explained and shown in the setting of his speech with Victor, he has to escape to the tundra wilderness to be happy within himself, which coincidentally is where Victor has chosen to use as his peaceful place so he can contemplate his grave error without the distraction of society. The monster distinctively says, "I heard about the slothful Asiatics; of the stupendous genius and mental activity of the Grecians; of the wars and wonderful virtue of the early Romans-of their subsequent degenerating-of the decline of that mighty empire; of chivalry, Christianity, and kings." ...read more.

Conclusion

Now, this may have been the reason for William's death, but could the exclusion of society because of the Monster's appearance have contributed further to his angst, being misunderstood by society and shunned into hiding has seen thoughts of a possible good, loving nature turned into a murderous revenge - seeking train of thought. Obviously his outcast in this manner is down to Victor creating a single ugly being so automatically becoming an outcast because of the bespoke nature of the being but also due to the fear of a different being in society or possibly a level of racism where a being not wanted in society will be made to abandon society as a means of survival. In conclusion, the authors of both A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess - and Frankenstein - Mary Shelley have don e well in concealing the ideas of an outcast in their novels, using the actions of the characters and knowledge of systematic psychological and sociological emotions the ideas of an outcast in the novels were unveiled. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ben Wood A2 English - November 10 Focusing On A Clockwork Orange and Frankenstein compare some of the ways authors explore the idea of what it means to be an outcast. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The English Patient

    5 star(s)

    In the Skin of a Lion is a novel by Canadian/Sri Lankan writer Michael Ondaatje. ... This article is about the book. ... Coming Through Slaughter is a novel by Michael Ondaatje, published in 1976. ... Salman Rushdie (born Ahmed Salman Rushdie, on June 19, 1947, in Bombay, India)

  2. Comparison of Brighton Rock & A Clockwork Orange. Explore the methods the writers ...

    Alex potentially has more suffering than any character in the two novels - not only from the physical agony that he sustains from his "vecks" on two occasions as well as the general violence imposed upon him, but also the mental anguish that he suffers from knowing that he cannot listen to "Ludwig Van and G.F.

  1. With the emphasis on Mary Shelleys Frankenstein and with wider reference to The Picture ...

    his point of view in a first person narrative in order to garner the sympathy of the audience. This technique serves to humanise him, and indicates possibly that Shelley is encouraging society to listen to outcasts instead of disregarding them and judging them.

  2. Critical Appreciation of 'The City of Orange Trees' ...

    Not only can the child not understand spirituality and religion, two things that define human existence and establish its superiority over other living beings, but they actually dismiss them as things of the past, as phenomena that have nothing to do with their own lives.

  1. Youth Culture In Parts 1 - 2 Of A Clockwork Orange

    rebellion and violence is in fact a young boy desperate to be heard and understood. The youths in A Clockwork Orange all want to be fighting against an evil oppressor who wants to stop them from doing what they want but it seems that Alex and his gang have free

  2. Compare the ways in which Aldous Huxley in Brave New World and Anthony Burgess ...

    And instead of feeling miserable, you'd be jolly.' There is also the use of 'Malthusian drill', a type of birth control which all women are required to take to keep their fertility under control and they are also required to take 'Pregnancy surrogate' when they reach a certain age to stop them from feeling broody.

  1. Compare and contrast the ways in which the writers of 'Frankenstein' and 'The Picture ...

    Wilde the aesthete focuses on beauty; namely, the beauty and purity of Dorian's soul. It is the deterioration of Dorian's self that he is shown to fear: Frankenstein's lost paradise is his friends and family, while Dorian loses his inner beauty.

  2. Comparative Essay: 1984 and A Clockwork Orange

    I believe that it is the government control depicted within A Clockwork Orange that is the most debauched due to the controversial alternative therapy used to enforce control. Conversely, the societal rules within 1984 have always been present and so the people have had no other option but to conform

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work