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Focusing primarily on the first five chapters of "Emma" discuss how Jane Austen gains and retains the readers interest.

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Introduction

Focusing primarily on the first five chapters of "Emma" discuss how Jane Austen gains and retains the readers interest Jane Austen was born in a village in Hampshire on the 16th of December 1775. She was the sixth child of Reverend George Austen and his wife Cassandra. Jane Austen accompanied by her sister Cassandra her elder sister attended school in Oxford and the Reading, although her education was completed at home like many of the heroines in her books. A rich local family without children of their own adopted her third brother Edward like Frank Churchill in "Emma". From the age of twelve she showed a keen interest in writing and produced a series of sketches and tales although her first book was not published until 1811, it was unheard of for a women novelist at this time so her literary works were signed by the author. Many of the events in her own life are reflected in her books, when her father died her family was forced to leave their home and go to live her one of her brothers she used this idea in her first book "Sense and Sensibility". In most of her books Jane Austen uses the third person narrative technique this shows that she was a skilled and prolific writer. She was not a professional writer and did not enjoy early success, however she did become a favourite of the Prince Regent and the first publication of "Emma" had its dedication page dutifully noted. ...read more.

Middle

Mr Weston's choice to marry a governess seems to point out that a mature man can do as he pleases. This letter creates intrigue for the reader into who Frank Churchill is and his intentions when he comes to visit. "Mr frank Churchill was one of the boasts of Highbury and a lively curiosity to see him prevailed." The reader is left wondering why a man who none of the characters have met is being so highly praised the language used is this passages suggests that Frank is a rich, handsome and successful man "boasts of highbury". This also suggests that there are numerous rumours about Frank and people are talking about his arrival. This makes the reader want to read on to see why he is being praised so highly. There is humour introduced at the end of this chapter as Mr Woodhouse declares that nobody can eat the cake as he cannot "He had therefore, earnestly tried to dissuaded them from having any wedding cake". This quote is ironic as Mr Woodhouse suggests that the apothecary will tell them how unhygienic it is to eat the cake when he himself is eating a piece. Mr Woodhouse is a source of humour and irony throughout the novel, this can be seen in chapter 6 when Emma has made a likeness of Harriet and Mr Woodhouse says she should be wearing a shawl in the summer to avoid catching a cold. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is trying to point out the happiness that Emma has taken form Harriet by not letting her accept Mr Martin's proposal. The social behaviour is very intriguing and helps the reader gather interest into when the book was set. The matchmaking of the central character Emma gathers pace throughout the book it shows her downfalls and good points, which the reader can relate to. Although the novel is set in a different era the issues raised of marriage and in some respects social class are still relevant in today's society. This gains the reader's interest there are various twist and turns in the novel, which help retain the reader's interest. It shows how women's rights were changing and how different lifestyles are now, the novel is very interesting as the events which are depicted in the book have happened in her own life. The suspense used at the end of the chapters creates intrigue making the reader want to find out what happens next the end of chapter 16 "..Such an evil hanging over her in the hour of explanation with Harriet.." Austen's use of archaic language and elongated sentences often make the themes hard to grasp although this is a good example of the language two hundred years ago. The book has many facts linked up to the fictional story, which keep it interesting it could almost be said that the novel is a historical document of the 18th century centred around moral issues like judgement of people from there appearance and the society in which people lived. Catherine Lowther 10M ...read more.

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