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For this essay I visited a local high school to gain evidence of how teenagers express themselves and converse with peers and adults, including adults in authority. I also observed an anger management session

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Gillian Tansey LNG 2001 Assess how the language of teenagers has changed over time The language of teenagers has changed radically over time, the use of slang and clich�s are now commonly used in everyday English Language, in particular amongst teenagers. For this essay I visited a local high school to gain evidence of how teenagers express themselves and converse with peers and adults, including adults in authority. I also observed an anger management session and listened to the language used in this setting and also at break times. The findings of these observations are on a tape recording enclosed. The language of teenagers is greatly affected by television and pop music and this contributes to the change in modern day English and the phrases and slang that teenagers use, for example in the high school I visited the teenage boys used a lot of phrases and words that are used in rap music, a boy referred to his friends as 'homies' rather that 'mates' of 'pals' the word 'homies' is used a lot within American rap music. This shows how teenagers are influenced and how these kinds of words become popular amongst teenagers. ...read more.


These words are still seen as crude by many people and other euphemisms have came into force such as toilet, bathroom. The teenagers regularly referred to the toilet as the 'loo' and 'bog'. Sex is another area where euphemisms flourish amongst teenagers, in the nineteenth century Jane Austin wrote in her novel 'they had no intercourse but what the commonest civility required' , Jane Austin would of not of expected the effect that this sentence would have on the modern day reader, in her time the word 'intercourse' meant 'dealings between people'. In the twentieth century the phrase 'sexual intercourse arrived this was used as a delicate way to refer to 'sex'. This has now been shortened to intercourse, and this sexual sense is now so common that the teenagers in the school I visited found it impossible to use the word 'intercourse' in any other sense. They also have their own words for sexual intercourse these words are not seen as offensive and are common in teenagers language. This shows how teenagers influence the change in word meanings and euphemisms in society. The teenagers in the school I visited also use a lot of clich�s which, again is another sign of language change in ...read more.


(Fo) shizzle, my nizzle - "(For) sure, my nigger", or alternatively, "yes, dear". -izzle is a standard suffix. So shizzle could also mean "shit" (meaning good), shoes, shirt or shed. (Slang a bluffers guide.1999.pg22) Wigga - a white nigger, a wannabe. This way of speaking seems very common nowadays, but I suspect if we were to listen to teenagers from London we would hear a lot more of these words as London's rap scene is a lot more popular than that of the North West. David Crystal says "It's very recent, this new rhythm that comes from rapping," Until recently, people have spoken in the rhythms of Shakespeare: 'tum te tum te tum'. But this new hip-hop accent is 'rat tat tat tat tat'. It's more common than Received Pronunciation these days. Hardly anyone speaks traditional RP any more - maybe one or two per cent." (The language revolution pg22) As the language of teenagers changes there will be many linguistic changes and different features introduced over time, as teenagers are very impressionable it is easy to see why these changes spread so quickly. Bibligraphy The language revolution. 2002. David Crystal(Cambridge: Polity Press), Flappers to rappers- American youth slang-.Tom Dalzell (Merriam-Webster / Springfield, Massachusetts. 1996.) Socialinguistics : Nikolas Coupland and Adam Jaworski. Palgrave (1997) ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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