• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

From reading the selected pre-1914 prose what do you learn of Hardy's use of vivid description, dramatic incident and reference to Nineteenth century customs and traditions?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Catherine Evans 11s January 26th, 2004 Coursework Pre-1914 Prose Thomas Hardy: The Withered Arm The Mayor of Casterbridge (Chapter one) The Return of the Native (pg 414 - 447) near end of novel From reading the above, what do you learn of Hardy's use of vivid description, dramatic incident and reference to Nineteenth century customs and traditions? Which of the three pieces was your favourite and why? From reading the two extracts and the story, I can see that the main difference in the book is how life is in the book compared to our modern 21st century. People in the 19th century depended very heavily on agriculture and farming especially in 'Wessex', where nearly all of Hardy's novels were set. Wages for agricultural labourers were the lowest in the country in Dorset, averaging out at the equivalent of 37p a week in 1840. Magic and superstition was rife in the 19th century, and many people believedin dark powers. Every village in Wessex was supposed to have their own witch. Magic play a big role in two of the stories which I am studying, 'The Withered Arm', and 'The Return of the Native'. ...read more.

Middle

In this case, Eustacia is very depressed and unhappy, so the weather is atrochiously stormy, raining and windy. Because, it has rained so much, the pool has created a whirlpool, and Eustacia falls in. To describe the scene more effectively, Hardy uses metaphors such as: 'Boiling cauldron', referring to the whirpool, the current, and emphasising the amount of water in the pool. Hardy's use of dramatic incident in all three of his stories manage to shape the whole story, especially in 'The Mayor of Casterbridge'. In think amin the dramatic incident in the extract is when Michael Henchard sells his wife at auction when he becomes drunk. The day after, Michael realises how stupid he has been and vows never to touch another drop of alcohol for however many years as his age. I think this is very effective because the day after Michael sells his wife and baby, he realises that alcohol changed him into something he doesn't want to be. In 'The Mayor of Casterbridge', when Hardy uses dramatic incident, we learn that Hardy builds up suspension before the dramatic climax. ...read more.

Conclusion

Gertrude obviously has no idea how this happened. Hardy's use of vivid description in the book is very effective throughout, but especially in Rhoda's vision. Rhoda is obsessed with the idea of Farmer Lodge being with another woman, and sends her son to look at Gertrude and report back to her. When he says that Gertrude is shorter that Rhoda, she seems pleased and smug about herself. I like the way how Hardy has interlinked everything, e.g. Rhoda's son's father is Farmer Lodge, the young man who was hanged was Rhoda's son. I think it is a very clever story, and at the end, Gertrude dies at the fright of seeing Rhoda's son dead, lying limp in the coffin. I think that the story shows that Rhoda is perhaps so obsessed about Farmer Lodge and Gertrude it is almost unhealthy, and because of this, maybe this is why she had the vision in the first place. I learn that Gertrude is forgiving, even though when she went to see Conjuror Trendle and he created the concoction of egg white and water, Rhoda's image formed. Gertrude was surprised, but she doesn't question it because she had no idea that Rhoda had anything to do with her arm. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Thomas Hardy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Thomas Hardy essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Thomas Hardy - analysis of three poems. Afterwards, During wind and rain ...

    3 star(s)

    'I come', he argues as if an obligation. The first two lines speak of a spiritual mourning - as one might feel in forcing oneself to face the memories of one whom one has betrayed emotionally. Thereafter, the mood slightly seems to change into that of spiritual exhaustion.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Hardy's use of Pathetic Fallacy

    3 star(s)

    love that they felt when they started out together; as if their courtship and marriage are the passing of just one day, in which Chapter 20 signifies the early morning. This also reiterates Hardy's message of fate; that Tess' death is as inevitable as the setting of the sun.

  1. Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge.

    In the essay "The Minimisation of Sexuality" by Robert Langbaum, he contends that there is a "minimum of sexual feeling in the novel as

  2. How does Hardy portray his grief and loss in The Voice?

    The poem is very sad as there will never be a chance for them to get back together as Emma is now dead. Hardy felt guilty as he may have been partly to blame for them splitting up. At the beginning of the marriage.

  1. What kind of a woman does Hardy describe Eustacia as being?

    However, Hardy describes her being on the heath to have "stifled the warmth within her", implying that the heath has changed her and made her resign into herself, not displaying the best of her character. Hardy describes Eustacia's main reason for unhappiness and loneliness in "isolation" and the prospect of a better life as being the want for love.

  2. "You could get people wrong," Sandra realises in 'The Darkness Out There'. Assess how ...

    The reader can see he was right, he mixed with the lower classes and was punished with a son. Therefore he had good reason to be wary when he implied Gertrude shouldn't talk to the people of the village yet she did, and was hurt.

  1. Thomas Hardy "The Withered Arm" and "The Sons Veto".

    Sophy's death was tragic as well as sad as she was denied the one happiness she wanted which was to marry Sam. We now see that Sophy's death may be resulted by the brutality of society and those around

  2. To what extent do you think Michael Henchard is responsible for his own downfall? ...

    He roared out." In the next part of the novel, Susan finds Henchard as a successful businessman as mayor of a small town called Castorbridge. "Mr. Henchard- now habited no longer as a great personage, but as a thriving business man."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work