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Georgian poetry was characterized by 'hazy idealism'. Write a comparison of these poems in the light of this statement.

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Introduction

Georgian poetry was characterized by 'hazy idealism'. Write a comparison of these poems in the light of this statement. The Georgian poets' early penchant for euphemisms of the war is echoed in each of these poems. Walter De La Mare's description of the soldiers as "warriors" and Sassoon's use of "happy legion" are clearly far from the truth but are nonetheless effective in softening the mood and hiding the grim reality of the British army. Death itself is also alluded to euphemistically as "a shining peace", "sunset", "part(ing) from life" and "lost in cloudless Paradise". This positive angle works to encourage potential soldiers to enlist by glorifying death and therefore eradicating fear. The Georgian style continues to disguise the war through the trademark use of vague imagery. ...read more.

Middle

The personification of the "earth" in Sassoon's, Owen's and De La Mare's poems as well as Brooke's use of "Dawn" and "sunset" as metaphors for birth and death in 'The Dead' are just some examples of the dream-like quality present in the Georgian poets' imagery. The titles "Futility", "Peace", "Absolution" and "Virtue" are all abstract nouns which instantly inform us of what to expect as they themselves are already vague and detached but with religious relevance. While absolution, virtue and peace are all positive words, futility is not. Peace (a state of harmony) and virtue (moral purity) appear to offer the soldiers tranquility as does absolution which, meaning 'purged of sins', could have also ensured the men that murder during war was forgiven by God. ...read more.

Conclusion

The brilliance in this surreal imagery could refer to the return to innocence and is further emphasized by the sibilance and the softening of 't's to 'th's. The "unbroken glory" arguably reveals Christ's state of perfection. Although Brooke's poem does not use an abstract noun for a title but a harsh reality, 'The Dead' makes no actual reference to death itself. The poem is gentle with euphemistic language and detached, yet romantic imagery of "colours", "music", "flowers", "laughter" and "rich skies". This deliberately tranquil atmosphere, combined with an abundance of caesurae which slow down the pace of the poem create an artificial state of peace easily labelled as 'hazy idealism'. - 1 - Jo Maund 13SLR ...read more.

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