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Hamlet's first soliloquy is essential to the play as it highlights his inner conflict caused by the events of the play.

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Introduction

Hamlet's first soliloquy is essential to the play as it highlights his inner conflict caused by the events of the play. It reveals his true feelings and as such emphasises the difference between his public appearance, his attitude towards Claudius in the previous scene is less confrontational than here where he is directly insulted as a "satyr".. In this presentation, I will outline how Shakespeare communicates the turmoil of Hamlet's mind with the use of imagery and other poetic devices. First, we will start off with a structural analysis of the soliloquy. At first glance, we can tell that it is written in free verse. There is no rhyme scheme, which is much similar Hamlet's ambivalent nature. ...read more.

Middle

At the start, Hamlet says that he wants his "too too solid flesh" to "...melt, thaw, and resolve itself into a dew". This goes alongside the later lines, "How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable seem to me all the uses of this world", where the build up of adjectives, one after the other, serves to highlight just how difficult it is for Hamlet to live in the world. It is as if Hamlet cannot deal with or, indeed, stand the physical side of life anymore; he needs to get rid of his body to be able to deal with the inner conflict going on in his head. The image that is expressed serves to reveal not only the tragic nature of his problem, also highlighted by his allusions to suicide, but also create a link between him and the audience. ...read more.

Conclusion

In this soliloquy, we also learn about Hamlet's adoration of his father and how this serves to emphasize the scorn that he shows towards his mother. Hamlet communicates that his father was a divine, almost 'god-like' character, "so excellent a king", who was "so loving to my mother". He also illustrates the contrast between the new king and the old and as such his mother's choice, "Hyperion to a satyr". This metaphor, analogy, and example of extreme contrast increases the importance of Hamlet's father, to the audience, and yet also makes a mockery of Claudius' character. Therefore, this soliloquy is successful in communicating the emotional state of Hamlet to the audience because it reveals the true nature of Hamlet's feelings through the use imagery and language of the text. It successfully highlights the different aspects of Hamlet and aids the audience in building a connection with him. ...read more.

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