• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Hardy's use of Pathetic Fallacy

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"In Hardy's hands, setting is more than mere location - it is a tool for developing both characters and themes." Evidence that Hardy chooses his locations for reasons far beyond geographical significance is apparent throughout Tess of the D'Urbervilles. In Chapter 20 in particular, the natural environment seems to act as a metaphor for Tess' character. The chapter begins "The season developed and matured." This gives the impression that the surroundings have, at the very least, womanly qualities, and it seems sensible, therefore to apply this to Tess in light of Hardy's defence of her purity and womanhood. Much of this chapter centres on description and nature, and Tess herself is effortlessly woven into both of these. Hardy uses the metaphor of a river to describe Tess and Angel's early experiences of one another: "All the while they were converging, under an irresistible law, as surely as two streams in one vale." As Tess has already mean shown as a very natural being in previous parts of the novel, this implies that she is drawing Angel towards her in a way that causes him to become more 'of nature' as well. ...read more.

Middle

Chapter 47 is very different from this, it describes the "threshing of the last wheat rick at Flint-comb Ash Farm". There is a strong sense of negativity and hopelessness within this chapter, an effective use of pathetic fallacy illustrating Tess' situation in this part of her life. The chapter also serves to demonstrate one of Hardy's themes, his disapproval of the mechanisation of the agricultural industry. Firstly, the negativity of the scene is overwhelming. "The dawn of the March morning is singularly inexpressive, and there is nothing to show where the eastern horizon lies." This ties together with the repetitive nature of the work, creating a wholly depressing scene. "It was the ceaselessness of the work which tried her severely, and began to make her wish she had ever come to Flintcomb-Ash." And "For Tess there was no respite; for, as the drum never stopped, the man who fed it could not stop, and she... could not stop either." Hardy draws strong comparisons between the threshing machine and the devil, calling it "the red tyrant the women had come to serve". ...read more.

Conclusion

"All around was open loneliness and black solitude, over which a stiff breeze blew." There is almost an air of horror when they reach Stonehenge, as if it were foreshadowing the nature of Tess' forthcoming death. Even Tess acknowledges the irony of her presence with the druid temple: "you used to say at Talbothays that I was a heathen. So now I am home." This seems as if some intervention has caused Tess to happen upon the place that many people would believe (especially within the historically context of the novel) is fitting for her. While Tess sleeps, Angel contemplates the location: "The band of silver paleness along the east horizon made even the distant parts of the Great Plain seem dark and near". The threatening disposition of the environment creates a sense of foreboding directly before Angel learns Tess' fate. This setting bears little resemblance to the biblical locations previously in the novel, such as the Garden of Eden, Heaven or Hell, there is a distinct feeling that there is some kind of presence here. Is Hardy painting the image of a limbo-type place for Tess, as she is no longer pure enough for Heaven, but he cannot bear to condemn her to hell? ?? ?? ?? ?? Sophie Miller English Literature Block 5 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Thomas Hardy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This essay demonstrates some understanding Hardy's use of the pathetic fallacy, but it would benefit from a clearer and more logical structure. It seems to pick out random chapters without having a sense of the whole.
An essay of this kind demands closer analysis of both the language and the themes of the book, and how the two are linked.
***

Marked by teacher Val Shore 23/02/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Thomas Hardy essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    In Tess of the DUrbervilles, how does Hardy present Tess and Angels relationship as ...

    5 star(s)

    known", striking fear into her honest heart and preventing her from using her feminine charms as a tool of persuasion. Tess genuinely believes him and does not think to suggest emigrating: her loyalty to him is such that she does not question his decision.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Which Character in Hardy's "Tess Of The D'Urbervilles" Do You Have the Most Sympathy ...

    4 star(s)

    parted and telling her to write to him if she needed 'anything at all'. His love for her remained and he told her 'There is no anger between us, though there is that which I cannot endure at present' but 'I will try to bring myself to endure it.'

  1. Compare the effects of the values and attitudes of the 1800s on the role ...

    To marry a woman of low background was not heard of. Farmer Lodge then instead marries to young and "tisty tosty little body enough" woman, whom has a high role in the social order "Yes: and more. A lady complete", this being Gertrude Lodge.

  2. Free essay

    Examine the statement Tesss life is damned from the start of 'Tess of The ...

    but not least are aspects of Tess' life which could not have been changed, factors which defiantly have shaped her life, arguably for the worse, which are her looks and her sex. Throughout Tess' life created by Hardy, her looks have been used to unconsciously attract men and to be

  1. To what extent do you think Michael Henchard is responsible for his own downfall? ...

    He also made an oath not to drink for 21 years, due to his hideous behaviour the previous night. In contrast to this, he later blames Susan for his atrocious attitude and behaviour and appears very angry at her. "...seize her, why didn't she know better than being me into this disgrace!"

  2. How does Hardy portray his grief and loss in The Voice?

    He does this as he only wants to remember her for the good times and good memorys they had together not the bad ones. Thomas Hardy's wife, Emma is referred to by Hardy as a "Woman much missed" she obviously meant a lot to him.

  1. Examine Thomas Hardys portrayal of women in twi if the stories you have read, ...

    Rhoda remains scared for a long time not knowing whether the dream was a dream until a couple of weeks later when Rhoda's worst fear comes true. After a meeting with Rhoda's son, Gertrude came over with some gifts. She sat down and had a chat with Rhoda and the matter of health arose into the conversation.

  2. Compare and contrast the characters of Alec DUrberville and Angel Clare in Tess of ...

    beauty as the reason for his passion for her, rather than her innate qualities. Hardy uses plosives when describing Alec for the first time ("lips", "badly", "points") to emphasise "the singular force" and violent, aggressive nature of the character. The contrast Hardy makes between Alec's full moustache and his relatively

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work