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Harp in the south

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Introduction

The Harp in the South portrays a world of struggles, hardship and deception that attracts lonely misfits. The mini-series by Anthony Buckley and based on the novel by Ruth Park explores the life of the Darcy family, who live as Irish immigrants in the slums of Sydney, Surry Hills. As the series progresses the audience is given an insight into the struggles, hardship and deception faced by the family, as they try to find their place in a world they don't feel they belong. However the love and support the family give each other proves that they are not lonely, rather they are just misfits. This is shown strongly through the characters of Hughie, Dolour and Roie. Throughout this discussion the term struggles refers to difficult events that the Darcy's have to deal with, created by their long term hardships, such as poverty. The term deception refers to the betrayal of others, in particular their loved ones. ...read more.

Middle

Out of all the characters Hughie is involved in the most deception; however the struggles and hardships he faces as a cause of this allow him to become a better person. Throughout the mini-series Roie suffers to achieve her idealistic world, which involves deceiving her family. Out of all the characters Roie is the most idealistic, she feels the need to be in a relationship and feel loved, which leads to her sacrificing her morals. Roie sacrifices her virginity so that Tommy will love her. However this only leads to her suffering the consequence when she falls pregnant. Roie desperately seeks her parent's approval of everything she does, and so she lies and deceives them to hide the truth, especially about her pregnancy. She craves a perfect, conventional family and she finds this in Charlie. Charlie gives Roie everything she could want, being love and marriage. Roie's happiness with Charlie is shown through the use of bright colours and open spaces whenever they are together, rather than the dim and dark colours which were used by Buckley to show Roie's relationship with Tommy. ...read more.

Conclusion

It seemed to be the most wonderful stuff she had ever seen". Unlike the rest of her family she is not accepting their living conditions; rather she is doing all she can to get out into the world and experience a different way of life. Dolour is not like Roie she is smarter and able to make more mature decisions, which define who she is. This and the fact that Dolour does the best she can to improve her life stops her from being a misfit and facing as many struggles and hardships as her family. The Harp in the South explores the life of 'misfits' struggling to find their place in the world. Their quest to find their place often involves hardships and the deception of people the love. These ideas are shown through the characters of Hughie, Dolour and Roie. However throughout the mini-series the audience sees the family move past their deception and hardships and realise what is important in life, family and love, and as long as they have that it doesn't matter what struggles they have to face. ...read more.

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