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How do poets celebrate life? Two poems that discuss moments or situations where life can be celebrated are Thomas Hardys Beeny Cliff and After reading in a letter proposals for building a cottage (Cottage) by John Clare.

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Introduction

How do poets celebrate life? Two poems that discuss moments or situations where life can be celebrated are Thomas Hardy's "Beeny Cliff" and "After reading in a letter proposals for building a cottage" ("Cottage") by John Clare. The poets particularly discuss the beauty of life with regards to the natural world around them and their thoughts on interaction with other people. Nature and features of animals and plants play a large role in these poems displaying their love of life. In the first stanza of Cottage it is mentioned that "grass plats grace the door". The use of the word "grace" is of significance here as this suggests that he feels that his home has been blessed with the presence of nature; or that at least he welcomes it. ...read more.

Middle

The relationship between the poets and other people has great significance and shows great difference in the way that they enjoy life. From the poems we can deduced that Thomas Hardy's time on Beeny Cliff was much better because of the presence of the woman; while John Clare seems to enjoy his time spent alone without much in the way of company. There are several points in the poem where this is suggested. From the first line of Cottage the shed is described as "my shed". If this was shared with a partner or companion it would read "our shed" which suggests he is living alone. In the second stanza his door "closes tight" as wells as "locks being a wanted thing" to keep thieves out at night"; which shows that he wants his cottage ...read more.

Conclusion

Whereas Clare describes the need to keep a distance between himself and others, Hardy uses his words in describing the woman, painting her as "the woman riding high above with bright hair flapping free". We know that he has strong feelings towards her as in the first stanza he describes her as "the woman who I loved so, and who loyally loved me. He also mentions that "the woman now is-elsewhere--", showing that unlike Clare he cares about not having company of other people. For further evidence of love for life in Cottage, ostensibly there is language such as "I love" "summer seat" and two uses of the word "sweet". In terms of structure it is laid out in symmetrical four line stanzas which match the neat and perfect picture portrayed in the poem. ...read more.

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