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How do you think that Stevenson wishes us to judge Dr Jekyll's experiments concerning Mr Hyde?

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Introduction

How do you think that Stevenson wishes us to judge Dr Jekyll's experiments concerning Mr Hyde? I think that Stevenson wants the reader to feel that Jekyll gets what he deserves for releasing Hyde. Although I think that this is his overall intention, he gives Jekyll's own justification for it, which dampens the blame from him slightly. However, the justification, when looked at more deeply, conveys another message from Stevenson, that Jekyll knows what he is doing and therefore commits a crime in releasing Hyde. Stevenson shows his feelings about Hyde and about Jekyll's guilt by lavishing Hyde with horrible descriptions. These fall into four main categories, the darkness, the evil, the animal, and peoples reaction to Hyde. Firstly, whenever Hyde appears, it is always 'night' or 'twilight' showing that there is something dark and mysterious about him. Hyde's eyes have a 'blackness' in them which terrifies people. There are several references to 'fire' and 'hell', suggesting that Hyde is a daemon, that has been released from hell. ...read more.

Middle

Perhaps the most startling aspect of Hyde is that when Jekyll showed Lanyon that he is, in fact, Hyde, Lanyon is so sickened by the thought of it that he becomes ill and dies in a few weeks. This shows absolutely that Jekyll does a terrible thing in unleashing Hyde, and actually telling somebody caused them to die, and Lanyon is one of Jekyll's closest friends. These images are put into the story frequently, and the effect of this is to make the reader feel that Jekyll has released a being so foul that he deserves whatever punishment he got. And still Stevenson piles it on. He goes into horrific detail about Hyde brutally murdering Sir Danvers Carew, this is clear evidence that he wishes us to feel that Jekyll is to blame for his own experiments. Stevenson's description of the murder is really "over the top", it starts off with Hyde having an 'ill-contained impatience'. Sir Danvers Carew is merely 'inquiring his way' to Hyde when he 'broke out' with a 'great flame of anger'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jekyll pays for his crimes heavily though, and this is one of the very few times in the story when Stevenson releases Jekyll from the blame. Jekyll is put to considerable expense to pay for Hyde's actions. When he tramples over the girl, he is forced to pay �100 to her parents. Not to mention the fact that he loses one of his closest friends by telling him and ends up committing suicide to pay for it. But I think that Stevenson wishes us to view even these with severity; firstly, Jekyll taunts Lanyon by bribing him with, 'power' and 'knowledge', in such a way that Lanyon cannot have refused to know what Hyde's secret is. On telling Lanyon, Lanyon dies. Jekyll wants to tell him about his experiments, he wanted to show off, and he insults Lanyon by referring to himself as his 'superior'. Jekyll obviously enjoys being Hyde, because he suffers a horrible pain when he transforms into him, and would not bother to do it if he wanted to. Sometimes, Jekyll has to 'triple' the dosage in order to transform, something that he wouldn't do unless he is willing to risk his life to transform. ...read more.

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