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How does Act 3, Scene 3 Develop the Audiences Understanding of the Character of Claudius and the Development of Dramatic Tension?

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Introduction

How does Act 3, Scene 3 Develop the Audiences Understanding of the Character of Claudius and the Development of Dramatic Tension? The audience's understanding of the character of Claudius in Act 3, Scene 3 is developed. Claudius is a corrupt politician, due to the fact that Denmark has become tragic, he is wicked enough to compromise the country of Denmark to satisfy, selfishly, his own cravings. At the beginning of Act 3, Scene 3, Claudius has become nervous, after watching Hamlets 'play'. He now knows that he murdered his own brother, King Hamlet. Claudius acts upon this immediately, culminating in him ordering Hamlets two friends, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to escort Hamlet on a voyage to England, and to depart immediately, "I your commission will forthwith dispatch, And he to England shall along with you." ...read more.

Middle

"My crown, mine own ambition, and my Queen." Claudius only wants to confess and be forgiven, because he wants to go to heaven, he does not regret the reason he sinned; "May one be pardoned and retain th'offence?" It was believed that if you die before you have chance to confess to any sins you may have committed during your life, you will end up in hell when you die. In Claudius's confession, the repetition of the letter "F" emphasises each word that contains these assertive "F's". He is dwelling over his "offence", whilst questioning the "twofold force", admitting his "fault", but asking for forgiveness of his "foul" sin, and wishing to be "free" of guilt. Claudius dwells over his guilt, desperately wanting to be able to go to heaven, feeling scared of going to hell; "O lim�d soul, that struggling to be free Art more engaged! ...read more.

Conclusion

At game, a-swearing, or about some act That has no relish of salvation in't - Then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven , And that his soul may be as damned and black As hell, whereto it goes." This heightens the dramatic tension, the audience sense that the climax of the play is due to arrive. Act 3, Scene 3 proves to the audience that King Claudius is guilty of murdering King Hamlet by his spontaneous confession. It helps the audience know how Claudius feels about his sin, that he is feeling remorse for murdering his brother, but is still wicked enough to be able to enjoy what he gained from his sin, the crown, and the Queen. Act 3, Scene 3 develops the dramatic tension effectively when Hamlet decides to take revenge upon Claudius, while Claudius is praying, but then creates even more tension when Hamlet postpones his revenge. ...read more.

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