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How Does Bronte Make You Feel Sympathy For Jane Eyre?

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Introduction

Adam Ward 10H December 5th 2001 How Does Bronte Make You Feel Sympathy For Jane Eyre? This story is written in a first person narrative, so it helps us sympathize with Jane as you share her thoughts and feelings. Jane was an orphan. Her maternal uncle looked after her, but later died. She then lives with her Aunt Mrs. Reed and her three cousins. (Mrs. Reed is Jane's uncle's widow.) There is a lack of relationship in the family in which she now lives in. ...read more.

Middle

All the blame gets put on Jane and her cousin John gets away unpunished. This shows favoritism making you sympathize with Jane as she is bullied and blamed. Jane is a young girl, terrified by the Red Room, because of the death of her uncle; " I resisted all the way." This shows that Jane does not want to go there and will do anything not to go there, as she acts out of character, by kicking and screaming. This makes you sympathize for Jane as I seems as if she is being tortured and punished for a mild offence. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is degrading Jane, calling her sly and showing no compassion for her what so ever. This again shows Jane has no status in the house as she is being described as a "Thing" by a servant, making us sympathize for her. Bessie on the other hand, who is also a servant, tries to sympathize with Jane, and sticks up for her, but, she still treats Jane as a low status person. " If you don't sit still, you will have to be tied down." Although she is only warning Jane of the consequences, she is treating her like an animal, "Tied down." Jane was locked in the Red Room ...read more.

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