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How does Enobarbus portray Cleopatra in Act 2 Scene 2 throughout the barge scene, and what techniques are used?

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Introduction

´╗┐How does Enobarbus portray Cleopatra in Act 2 Scene 2 throughout the barge scene, and what techniques are used? In Act 2 Scene 2, Enobarbus describes the first meeting between Antony and Cleopatra on the Nile, in all its glory. Enobarbus, a typically blunt solider uses poetic language in describing Cleopatra?s appearance, showing the effect that the Egypt Queen has on men, making her seem all the more powerful. ?The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne Burned in the water? conveys a sensual impression of Cleopatra, showing her coming down the Nile in the most luxurious fashion making her seem like a desirable object for the Roman men. The description of silver and gold on the barge Cleopatra travelled on shows the elegance the Egyptian Queen carries with her and the impression she leaves on men. ...read more.

Middle

When the Egyptian Queen is on the barge, it is said ?On each side her Stood pretty dimpled boys, like smiling Cupids? ? the simile used, shows the queen in almost awe, as cupids are associated with love which most people crave and when used with Cleopatra, it would portray her as wanton - to be desired and craved. Nearly every detail of Cleopatra?s appearance is described by the solider, as he even notes that the winds ?did seem To glow the delicate cheeks which they did cool?. This language would not have been expected from the almost cynical soldier, and gives us the impression that Cleopatra has a bewitching effect on those she meets, showing her to be even more desirable. Enobarbus later refers to Cleopatra?s gentlewomen who tend to her as mermaids and sea-nymphs, the daughters of Nereus the sea god ? ...read more.

Conclusion

In Enobarbus? description of Cleopatra? entrance, he makes great use of polysyllabic language that would not be expected from a Roman Soldier, never mind used by him in describing an Egyptian beauty. This helps show the effect that Cleopatra has on nearly all men, giving the impression that she is that enchanting, men will fall and become besotted by her. Enobarbus mentions Antony first, in his political authoritarian manner through ?Enthroned i?th?market-place, did sit alone? but shows that he too was drawn to Cleopatra. We get the impression through this, that Cleopatra is that intriguing and electrifying that even the strongest soldiers fall for her. Enobarbus finally says ?And made a gap in nature? when describing Antony going to Cleopatra, to make it seem unnatural that a man of Antony?s position would seek her out, however this shows us that Cleopatra could captivate any man, despite their restraint. ...read more.

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