• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Does Friel Introduce And Present The Themes Of Language And Translation In The Opening Sequence Of The Play?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Does Friel Introduce And Present The Themes Of Language And Translation In The Opening Sequence Of The Play? Throughout the opening sequence of Brian Friel's " Translations" the themes of language and translation occur frequently and in many different forms. The theme of language comes up in the very first few pages; we are introduced to many different levels of language from different characters. For example, Jimmy reading Greek stories to himself, Manus, who is fairly literate and knowledgeable and then Sarah who is trying to pronounce her name with the aid of Manus. She has a speech defect and has not been able to speak, she communicates via hand signals and "grunts". ...read more.

Middle

Jimmy however, who can speak Latin, Greek and Irish is used to introduce a different format of language and translation compared to Sarah. Jimmy literally translates from Greek to Irish, whilst doing that he seems to incorporate the stories into his own world making no division between what he reads and what actually happens. "Manus, sir, if you had a women like that about the house, it's not stripping a turf bank you'd be thinking about-eh?" Also in the next few lines he compares the goddess with a woman from Baile Beag and whom he would choose if he had the choice. Jimmy also compares himself to Ulysses, as they both have to have a lack of hair and some other qualities in common. ...read more.

Conclusion

However Manus tries his best to correct the tension between himself and Maire without great success. We know this as the body language between the pair, for example Maire constantly ignoring Manus, possible flirting with Jimmy and dismissive conversation or the lack of it between them. This suggests some kind of relationship between Manus and Maire or past relationship. Many different forms of communicating appear in this play, as there is a different kind of relationship between each character and another. For example Maire seems to control the conversation between her and Manus whereas he seems patronising and slightly controlling towards Sarah. There are many different relationships like these throughout the first sequence. All the way through this first sequence there are different forms of language and translation presented to the audience. They come in many different varieties, some more subtly than others. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Brian Friel section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Brian Friel essays

  1. How does the language and structure used in the play Flowers for Algernon help ...

    This line contributes to Charlie's image of being noble and that he was brought up to be honest, and that he tries to make the best of what he has. As the play progresses, Charlie's personality becomes different; from a caring, noble man to someone who is spiteful, protective of himself and selfish.

  2. "The British are bad news to the Irish" - "Explore critical views and explain ...

    to write a play about Irish speaking peasants being suppressed by the English sapper. I don't want to write a threnody on the death of Irish language. I don't want to write a play about land-surveying, I didn't want to write a play about naming places."

  1. How does Friel present the duality at the heart of the character O(TM)Neill in ...

    This paragraph emphasis the state of unrest in Ireland and the connections that Harry suggests that need to be made in England, enforces the idea that Ireland need to be united before any other external enemy tries to make any more of an impact on Ireland in order to resist them.

  2. There are some dramatic devices and techniques that Friel uses to illuminate the play's ...

    Friel is interested in this and wants to show this to the audience. Friel must know that not many of his audiences will understand the Gaelic language and so uses English instead of Gaelic so that the audiences can understand.

  1. The language used in 'Blood Wedding'

    The Moon enters, the Moon is an unseen force, yet Lorca chooses to give the Moon a physical form, power and life. The Moon seems to represent the lovers' fate, through the verse we can see that the Moon wants to find the lovers and has the power to do so with his light.

  2. What do you find of significance in Friel's presentation of the world of the ...

    Sarah is stuck in the hedge-school as she cannot speak and is considered by the community to be dumb as her speech defect is so bad. She is ranked in one of the lowest social positions because she cannot venture much further out of the hedge-school as she cannot communicate

  1. How Does Friel Introduce And Present The Themes Of Language And Translation In The ...

    "Manus, sir, if you had a women like that about the house, it's not stripping a turf bank you'd be thinking about-eh?" Also in the next few lines he compares the goddess with a woman from Baile Beag and whom he would choose if he had the choice.

  2. How does the opening sequence to Translations prepare the audience for what is to ...

    the Baile Beag society in that it acts to compliment Sarah, yet in a very colloquial manner. All of this is done to prepare the audience for a contrast between the people of Baile Beag and the more formal, intrusive British forces present in Ireland so to accentuate the differing nature of the two societies.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work