• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Does Stevenson Create a Sense of Mystery & Horror?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Does Stevenson Create a Sense of Mystery & Horror? "So ugly that it brought out the sweat on me like running." Several factors contribute to the creation of different emotions and feelings. Stevenson uses a multitude of ways to give the overall effect of mystery and horror rather than a sudden, obvious indication. In the first paragraph the author starts making a list to describe the house in an eerie way. His use of vocabulary at this point is obvious but effective, using words like 'sinister', 'sordid negligence' and 'blistered.' No longer does it seem as if the author is describing a door on the street but a corrupted infected corpse and by provoking thoughts of death and suffering horror comes to play. ...read more.

Middle

So the scene is set lonely, cold, dark with only the flickering street lamps playing shadow games in the night. The description of the street in the first chapter reinforces this theme of duality. The street is described as merely an anonymous street in London, whose shop fronts "like rows of smiling women" have a brightness that stands out in contrast to the dingy neighbourhood. And yet on this street, two doors from the corner, stands a dreary, Gothic house, which "bore in every feature the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence." As we proceed further in the novel, Jekyll´┐Żs house itself will be seen to have an innate duality: congenial, prosperous, respectable, as well as threatening, mysterious, and sinister. This duality is manifested by each of its two facades: the respectable, Jekyll side of the house stands out in contrast with the seediness of its neighbouring structures. ...read more.

Conclusion

Doctors jobs are to preserve life and they deplore violence in every form and so when this "cut-and-dry apothecary ...turned sick and white with a desire to hill [the juggernaut]" every time he saw him we can not but sense the evil which these people feel towards the 'prisoner.' Compared to the last paragraph or so this paragraph progresses at quite a pace as if to reflect the speed at which people's emotion turned from nothing to sadness to hate. Stevenson writes as if there is a final explanation as to whom this mystery figure is but does not let on and instead let's the suspense build. He occasionally allows a small amount of information out just to wet the appetites and keep up an atmosphere of mystery and confusion. This atmosphere one of controlled suspense, a gradual building up of a sense of horror and destruction is achieved through a slow accumulation of unemotional detail, which begins in this chapter. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Robert Louis Stevenson section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Robert Louis Stevenson essays

  1. With particular reference to the construction of Mr Hyde, discuss how portrayal of the ...

    with "infected eyes", "gasping with open mouth", and suddenly the figure standing right in front of, and "staring" at Lanyon is no longer Mr Hyde, but Dr Jekyll. Stevenson continues to use Gothic language to describe Hyde's metamorphosis to Jekyll which will particularly terrify contemporary readers as Stevenson was writing

  2. Consider the writers' intentions in writing their Gothic stories - To what extent do ...

    These Emotions of lust and love are not present in Jekyll and Hyde, where as they are a key aspect in Dracula. Another key difference that appeared in Dracula was a motive. The motive of falling in love made this man wild and crazy.

  1. Consider atmosphere and setting in the 19th century stories you have read, and discuss ...

    much around the Victorian era, it is based on body snatching which was largely "popular" in the 19th Century, and was in great need for medical reasons and research. Stevenson begins by setting the seen and introducing characters. The first paragraph of the story seems very cozy and a regular

  2. Explore Stevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and the Body Snatchers as both gothic ...

    The hypocrisy here lies with the main character, Dr Jekyll represents the respectable nobleman while Mr Hyde reflects Dr Jekyll's acts behind closed doors, he is the side that can be ruthless in society as he cannot be recognised as Dr Jekyll and therefore he does not lose any social grace within his social circle or in society.

  1. Discuss how Stevenson uses descriptive passages to evoke a mood of horror in The ...

    and he spoke with a husky, whispering and somewhat broken voice..."There must be something else," said the perplexed gentleman. "There is something more, if I could find a name for it. God bless me, the man seems hardly human! Something troglodytic, shall we say?

  2. To what extent can Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea and Jamaica Kincaid's Ovando be ...

    They infuse the novel with a sense of unease and a sense of disturbance in the characters that the readers can relate to. Similarly, in Ovando many of these features of displacement and the uncanny are evident and the anxiety and dread that this imposes on the reader is what gives this story its gothic overtones.

  1. With close reference to the setting of 'Psycho' and 'Edward Scissor hands' discuss how ...

    bed, it is almost as if it is letting the darkness in from the outside of her room and the view beyond the window frame is of the house. The house has become even darker and no visible features can be seen eg.

  2. The Well - Gothic Horror by Elizabeth Jolley.

    The fragmented narrative, an overtone of gothic horror is a key ingredient for creating the mystery and the anticipating suspense of what is about to occur. Set in rural Australia The Well runs parallel to ones that are greatly influenced by the gothic genre.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work