• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Williams develop our understanding of Stanley in this scene? As well as looking at his speech & actions, also consider the relationship he has with both Stella and Blanche.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Williams develop our understanding of Stanley in this scene? As well as looking at his speech & actions, also consider the relationship he has with both Stella and Blanche Scene 2 Williams shows Stanley as loud, sexist, aggressive and an over-powering animalistic character. Stanley's actions are largely motivated by his wish to protect his wife and unborn baby; this is a natural reaction for which he should not be judged on. Stanley sees Blanche as a threat, an invasion of his territory, something that needs to be dealt with. Stanley is continuously described as brutish by Blanche; a fact that he never protests. In my opinion Blanche is as much if not more to blame for her eventual downfall at the hands of Stanley. ...read more.

Middle

She knows that he has no need for the polite evasions that are so important to her. She also understands instinctively his need to dominate. And she is not blind to Stanley's aggression as Stella is: "I have an idea she doesn't understand you as well as I do". In their attitudes toward money, we see the difference in class between them. Stanley is convinced that he is being swindled, but after a moment it becomes clear that Blanche is capable of no such thing. She does not care for money; she only understands how to spend it, and that is part of why Belle Reve was lost. ...read more.

Conclusion

One of the biggest factors in their relationship is the way Stella is attracted most to Stanley, is the very thing that Blanche hates so much, his animalistic nature. Stella makes her feelings for her husband very clear showing her desire saying when he's away for a week I nearly go wild. Stella is the link between the two, must listen to the facts given to her by Stanley, and the advice given to her by Blanche and decides who she wants to side with, predictably she sides with Stanley. It seems difficult to separate love and lust in Stanley's relationship with Stella. The fact Stella and Stanley are mutually dependent on each other is very obvious throughout the play. What is also obvious is that the two have achieved a balance that is disrupted by the arrival of Blanche. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level A Street Car Named Desire section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level A Street Car Named Desire essays

  1. A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown.

    the beginning of the story to end the story Stanley is insistent on discrediting her stories. Eventually Stanley does crack her stories, he tells his wife Stella the truths about Blanche's past, " This is after the home-place had slipped through her lily-white fingers!

  2. Slate & Me and Blanch McBride by Georgia Savage - review.

    Finally, Part Three, the 'And Later' part, made a leap in time. It was at the point where everything started to get in place and the gaps filled. This is another one of the jump that occurred at first with the italicised page, from Blanche being rescued, Wyn captured to

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work