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How far and in what ways does Owen present the youth in Anthem for Doomed Youth? Pay close attention to the language, tone and form of the poem. Remember to consider the poem in light of other poems by Owen.

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Introduction

"...for these who die as cattle" How far and in what ways does Owen present the youth in "Anthem for Doomed Youth"? Pay close attention to the language, tone and form of the poem. Remember to consider the poem in light of other poems by Owen and in view of the context in which he was writing. "...for these who die as cattle" How far and in what ways does Owen present the youth in "Anthem for Doomed Youth"? Pay close attention to the language, tone and form of the poem. Remember to consider the poem in light of other poems by Owen and in view of the context in which he was writing. "...for these who die as cattle" How far and in what ways does Owen present the youth in "Anthem for Doomed Youth"? Pay close attention to the language, tone and form of the poem. Remember to consider the poem in light of other poems by Owen and in view of the context in which he was writing. "...for these who die as cattle" How far and in what ways does Owen present the youth in "Anthem for Doomed Youth"? Pay close attention to the language, tone and form of the poem. ...read more.

Middle

A similar use of rhetorical questioning is seen through, "What candles may be held to speed them all?" referring to the 'candles' lit in the church ceremonies in which the youths' souls are 'speeded' off to heaven. Instead of candles lit in the soldiers' memory, they must make do with the flicker of grief shown in their comrades' eyes. This depicts the youth dying an animalistic death without glory and respect since they have no authentic funeral. They are simply left in no man's land and we see that the youths' souls can never be at peace since they have suffered so much degradation throughout the warfare. We hear the 'monstrous anger of the guns' and the 'stuttering rifles' rapid rattle' where the 'guns' are personified as 'monstrous' showing the total role reversal of mankind and weaponry. Personification is also shown by the 'stuttering rifles' which presents to us an image of the weapons being more significant than the young soldiers just like the war being more important that the loss of numerous lives, further disgracing the youth. This inversion of important values is also seen in Arms and the Boys where Owen states, "...keen with hunger of blood;" The blade is described in an uncompassionate ...read more.

Conclusion

This funeral highlights the distance between funerals on the Western Front and their relatives back at home. For Owen, there would be no revivals, no encores; the war that witnessed nearly ten million deaths had wrung out of him all belief in the hereafter: 'And each slow dusk a drawing down of blinds.' The harsh consonantal attack of'd' sounds in the sentence stress the closure as if the final curtain in a play. The emphasis on the finality reminds the reader of death and the use of 'dusk' highlights the fact that this is a repeated daily chore on the battlefield presenting to the reader the incessant and numerous youths that lost their lives on the Western Front. Throughout the poem the point that is emphasised is that the youthful soldiers that died on the Western Front did not receive dignified endings and even in death, battle still raged around them. Additionally, we see that each soldier will not be remembered because they are one in so many that have no elaborate funeral. The youth are dehumanised, demoralised and made insignificant by the weaponry that dominated the war and we experience their vicious nature throughout Owen's poems and the dismay they brought upon the youth that fought in the war. ?? ?? ?? ?? Thamanya Kugathasan 12/02/11 ...read more.

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