• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Might You Interpret The World Of The Fairies In A Midsummer Nights Dream?

Extracts from this document...


How Might You Interpret The World Of The Fairies In A Midsummer Nights Dream? Mid summer nights dream is one of William Shakespeare earlier plays, it was written in the late fifteen hundreds. The title suggests that the play was set in the midsummer, on the shortest night of the year; it being on the shortest night of the year gives that mystical eeriness about the play. Within the play there are three worlds each having its own set of people. The three sets of characters within the play are, the nobles, the mechanicals and the fairies. The nobles were the wealthy people living and ruling in Athens. The characters from this group are Theseus, Theseus is the duke of Athens, and he is getting married to Hippolyta in four nights. Because Theseus is the duke of Athens when people have problems within their lives they go to see, so he can lead them in the right direction. Egeus is also a noble, he is the father of Hermia, Hermia loves Lysander and Lysander loves Hermia, but Hermia's father want his daughter to marry demetrius, Demetrius is also a noble like Lysander, either is better than the other, but Demetrius left his ex-lover Helena how still loves him, how ever he does not love her. ...read more.


The mechanicals play requires the audience within the play (at the dukes wedding) to use their imagination and the illusion of factors within the production. The play is trying to get us to do that also. Most of the play is set within the wood on one mystical night, which in their minds is four nights till the dukes wedding, the magical night ends when the duke and his hunting party arrives, he seems to bring dawn and the return everything to normal. This could refer to the meaning of Athens' order. The nearly whole play is based around the love of the characters. Mature love is shown involving not only raw passion and emotion but also thoughtfulness and forgiveness between the characters. Marriage in the play is shown as loves proper out come and how all relationships should all end up in the end. Where as Oberon's and Titania's relationship how the harmony of the world is effected and upset when their relationship is at a rough time, showing that the spiritual world has powerful purpose of the world, when their relationship is at a good time the world is running smoothly and all is normal, maybe this is why the four nights turn into one because the world and its patterns are disrupted by Titania's and Oberon's arguments. ...read more.


As she makes clear, when she refuses the hand over of the Indian boy to Oberon, as it is a memory of the Indian boy's dead mother. When under her husbands love spell her scenes with bottom, the donkey, are sensual, caring and comic. She too is active in the mortal world. At the end of the play both Oberon and Titania settle their dispute and are reunited as lovers. This gives the play a sense of completeness. Finally there is Puck Oberon's mischievous servant. He loves to play pranks on humans. He is not very reliable or efficient at carrying out his tasks. For example when he confuses the four lovers and puts the love potion on the wrong lover. Puck never seems to feel regret when he carries out his pranks. His character is based on a traditional folklore figure called Robin Goodfellow. In performance Puck is presented in many different ways. Often a very physical character, with mime as important as speech. He is also often played in a 'naughty school boy' style. These three characters are some times mirrored into the world of Athens. The actors who play Oberon and Titania also play Theseus and Hippolita. And Puck is mirrored as Theseus's servant. Michael Mullarkey ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level A Midsummer Night's Dream section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level A Midsummer Night's Dream essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Write an essay on the following passage (3.1.80-135) from A Midsummer Night's Dream.

    4 star(s)

    night wanderers, laughing at their harm' (2.1.39). While acknowledging Puck's mischievousness, however, I would de-emphasise hints of malevolence and emphasise, rather, the continuation of the extract's comical tone. It is significant that Puck is alone on stage as he soliloquises, a moment for him to revel in his mishievousness and his own ability to reinvent himself.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    A Midsummer Nights Dream Shakespeare's treatment of illusion and reality in the play

    3 star(s)

    If this balance was upset in any way this could have serious consequences. Shakespeare uses this idea, when Titania and Oberon argue over the boy in her care; it has terrible affects on the natural world, the seasons alter quite remarkably and this sets off a sequence of harmful events that the humans find themselves involved in.

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Shakespeare - Midsummer Night's Dream "In what ways (and to what ends) does Shakespeare ...

    3 star(s)

    Metamorphosis is also employed directly a as plot device. This is prevalent in the contrast between the sustained complaining of Egeus' initial appearance and the rapid capitulation of his second in Act IV, though this could be discerned as a narrative discrepancy on Shakespeare's part, he is merely a functional

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Why is Bottom such a well-loved character? Explain with reference to 'A Midsummer Nights ...

    3 star(s)

    The audience would find this very funny and would make Bottom even better loved for being so oblivious! It is a kind of dramatic irony that the audience know that he has got an ass' head but he hasn't got a clue.

  1. A Midsummer Night's Dream is an exploration of thematic opposites such as day/night, love/freedom ...

    Oberon: "Give me that boy, and I will go with thee" Titania: "Not for thy Fairy Kingdom" In one production by Tara Art, Hippolyta slaps Theseus in the face when he refuses to overbear Athenian law for the young lovers.

  2. In A Midsummer Nights Dream, all of the action is set in the setting ...

    She describes how she "thought a serpent ate my heart away" which is a prophetic dream that tells the truth and predicts the change and nightmare. It is also significant that the image is of a serpent as, because of the story of the Garden of Eden, the serpent is

  1. Reasons why Shakespeare has used two different settings in 'A Midsummer Nights Dream'

    This is another of the contrasts between the two settings. For example, when in Athens, Hermia is generally assertive but polite at the same time, however in the wood she loses all 'ladylike' mannerisms and tries to attack Helena, as well as insulting her with phrases such as 'O me, you juggler, you canker-blossom, you thief of love'.

  2. What makes "A Midsummer Night's Dream" an Elizabethan comedy?

    Comparatively, the fairies speak in varied meters, like iambic pentameters and tetrameters. They also speak in six, seven and nine syllable lines. "How now, spirit, whither wander you?" The fairies' speech contains a lot more rhyme and is like a song.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work