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How The Author Of "A Fable for Tomorrow" Uses Language to Convey Changes and Contrasts in Mood and Meaning

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Introduction

How the Author of "A Fable for Tomorrow" Uses Language to Convey Changes and Contrasts in Mood and Meaning - TMA 01 The extracts give the impression of stark contrast, even contradictions, from the very beginning. The author chooses to use the word fable in the title, which, traditionally, is something fictional and also usually refers to the past and yet this is coupled with 'tomorrow'. This indicates that the author is looking to show the reader that, although the situation she refers to in the second extract may not be factual in its entirety, it may not be long before it is. Carson uses graphical descriptions to convey the idea of harmony and peacefulness in the first paragraph 'white clouds of bloom drifted above the green fields'. ...read more.

Middle

She gives the reader the impression that this is somewhere she is fond of and appreciates. Carson's tone changes dramatically from the first sentence of the second extract. The words 'strange blight' invoke a sense of fear and foreboding. The bleakness of the second extract is even starker in comparison to the light and sensory pleasing first. The author invokes a feeling of inhumanness with phrases such as 'evil spell' and 'mysterious maladies'. Carson gives the impression that the deaths and sickness is widespread when she refers to 'flocks of chicken' and 'much illness'. She also gives us information that indicates that the situation has affected the whole town, both animal and human, adult and child. ...read more.

Conclusion

Carson leaves the reader in no doubt as to the validity of her claims 'many real communities have already suffered'. She continues the eerie theme of the second extract with the phrase 'grim spectre', which is both frightening and bleak in its seriousness. In conclusion I believe that Carson effectively uses sensory descriptive language in the first extract to invite the image of serenity and innocence. This is so contrasting in tone to the second extract that it has an even greater impact. The reader is not given an escape from the destruction of the lives of the inhabitants of the town. By doing this the author evokes anger in the reader and a want for change. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 Sally Philp PI: U0907637 ...read more.

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