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How the gothic motif of good vs evil is presented in Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights and Macbeth

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Introduction

Reema Begum English Literature Explain how the gothic motif of good vs. evil is presented in Wuthering Heights, Macbeth and Frankenstein. The motif of good vs. evil is represented in Wuthering Heights, Macbeth and Frankenstein. Firstly, in Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte, the juxtaposition of the settings may be considered as good and evil. Wuthering Heights is depicted to signify the ?evil? in comparison to Thrushcross Grange. This is because in the first dwelling, ?Wuthering? is used to connote the atmosphere of the location. As ?Wuthering? connotes an extremely windy and turbulent area, it suggests that the inhabitants within the household lead chaotic lives. In addition, the isolated and exposed setting reflects upon the persona of characters such as Heathcliff. ...read more.

Middle

that Heathcliff does intend to be a better person ?behaved well? However it can be argued that the situation of being an orphan and having unfair treatment ultimately lead him to become a ruthless and heartless character later on in the novel. On the other hand it can be assumed that the unsuccessful relationship with Cathy?s character had lead him to be the character he was towards the end of the novel, thus Cathy?s death had a significantly negative effect on Heathcliff?s character which may show that he?s character was evil. The novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley also displays evidence of good vs. evil. It may be considered that Victor Frankenstein?s character is both evil and good. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another protagonist who portrays both evil and good roles is by Macbeth?s character. Like Heathcliff and Victor Macbeth?s character starts off heroic, however this is then corrupted by thirst of power. A ?good? character in the play, may be considered to be Duncan?s character. It is through Duncan?s generosity what we acknowledge ?Brave Macbeth, well he deserves that name? this shows that Macbeth is a noble and courageous individual who has earned whatever he has received through hard work and dedication. Essentially Duncan?s statement about Macbeth juxtaposes all the following actions he makes in the play. Though Macbeth is brave in committing the murderous deeds, it can be argued that Macbeth no longer fulfils his crime in honour of his country, but for his own selfish desires. ...read more.

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