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How Was The Stalemate Finally Broken?From Christmas 1914 until March 1918 there had been a stalemate on the western front

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Introduction

How Was The Stalemate Finally Broken? From Christmas 1914 until March 1918 there had been a stalemate on the western front. Both sides had just been sitting in their trenches. The British didn't do much but the Germans spent the time digging into the ground to create shell proof bunkers. In 1918 the stalemate was broken for four reasons: 1) New technology i.e. Tanks, gas and aircraft 2) America joining the war in 1917 3) The British blockade of Germany 4) The German Offensive in March 1918 My answer to the question will cover all four of the reasons and explore how important each was. New Technology Lots of new technology that had never been used or seen before was used in the war. Some helped a lot whilst others didn't do much. I will explore the importance and how much each helped. Tanks Tanks were invented early in the war by the British but were rejected because they were said to be impractical. However Winston Churchill thought them to be a good idea and financed the project and two years later they were used on the battle of the Somme. The first machines moved very slowly and more than half of them broke down before they even reached the battlefield. ...read more.

Middle

When the first gas was used panic-stricken French and Algerian troops fled creating a four-mile gap in the Allied line. If the Germans had been prepared for this they could have made a breakthrough into the allied lines. All it ever succeeded in doing was lowering troop morale. Aircraft In 1914 the airplanes were very unreliable and extremely dangerous. At the start of the war all they did was observation of the enemy. But as they became more advanced and faster they started being used for reconnaissance of enemy trenches. The photographs they took were sometimes incredibly useful for the opposing side. When a recon aircraft was spotted an enemy plane would be sent up to shoot it down and soon the term "dogfight" had emerged. In earth dogfights the pilots would only be armed with pistols and rifles to use to destroy the enemy craft but as the technology improved the planes became sleeker and faster and were fitted with machine guns that were synchronised so the bullets didn't destroy the propeller. By the end of the war airplanes could drop bombs and torpedoes. This meant that these planes could perform air raids. I don't think the aircraft really broke the stalemate and although they helped both sides they did not do much. ...read more.

Conclusion

The troops were also badly disciplined and were badly fed and supplied. But after this the Germans made no further progress as they had run out of resources. The Germans had ended the stalemate but now the allies had the advantage as their troops were well equipped and well fed. They were also supported by tanks, aircraft and improved artillery. By October the Germans were in full retreat and on the 11th of the 11th 1918 a ceasefire came into effect and The Great War had ended. I think that the German Offensive was the main reason for the stalemate being broken and if they hadn't attacked the war could have gone on for a lot longer. But in doing this they effectively lost the war for themselves. By the end of the war out of their original 700,000 soldiers, 5,768,000 Germans were dead or seriously injured. This meant that they had lost just over 8 times their original amount of troops. In my opinion the reason for the stalemate bring broken was the German offensive rather than anything else and although the others contributed to the stalemate being broken. If only one of the four things happened then I think that the German offensive would be the one thing that breaks the stalemate. ?? ?? ?? ?? Adam Merrison Page 1 ...read more.

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