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Imagine you are a modern day film director who is updating Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' that would appeal to a contempary cinema audience. Write a detailed explanation of how you would direct Act 3 scene 4 of the play.

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Introduction

Georgia Fernandez. Imagine you are a modern day film director who is updating Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' that would appeal to a contempary cinema audience. Write a detailed explanation of how you would direct Act 3 scene 4 of the play. Shakespeare is one of the most magnificent writers of all time; he has written many plays, one of which I have been challenged to write a detailed explanation of how I would direct the scene so that it would appeal to a contemporary cinema audience. One of the greatest aspects about Shakespeare's plays is the never-ending interpretations and expressions that can be made--not only by filmmakers with their elaborate scenery and all-star casts, but also by each of us as viewers and, hopefully, as readers too. Shakespeare originally directed the play so everything was incredibly dramatic as there were no special effects or excellent props available, so they used everything they had to their best advantage. In Shakespeare's theatre people only had temporary seats as everyone mostly moved around to get the best view of the spectacle. However, today, plays have almost everything available for them such as, special effects, brilliant props and a variety of excellent female and male actors. In Act 3 scene 4 of Hamlet, the agitated prince rudely interrupts his mother, Gertrude and the scheming Polonius, Ophelia's father, in the Queen's chambers. ...read more.

Middle

To begin the scene I would start with Polonius trying to get Gertrude to speak with Hamlet about his 'pranks', he talks to her softly and caringly. I have chosen this scene to be set in the restaurant's kitchen so when Gertrude and Polonius hear Hamlet coming Polonius quickly hides behind a kitchen counter so he is not in view of Hamlet when he enters and talks with his mother. Hamlet then enters the stunningly clean kitchen, and says 'Mother you have my father much offended'. This tells us that Hamlet's father is offended about what she has apparently done, he has been directed to say it looking very cross and angry to show that he is standing up for his dead father. As Hamlet says this I would direct him to lean over his mother to show he is in charge and extremely angry, Gertrude in turn looks at him and appears stunned at her sons unusual behaviour. As Hamlet and Gertrude carry on their conversation, Hamlet is increasingly getting angrier with his mother, because at the moment he is certain that she was in on such a horrible deed with Claudius, and she is not admitting it, although she is innocent he does not know this. ...read more.

Conclusion

not to forget his visitation as it is important, if he does then there would have been no purpose in him coming. 'whet' means to sharpen a knife so Shakespeare means that Hamlet should 'sharpen his blunted memory' if he forgets the visit from his father. After the visitation Hamlets behaviour strangely changes, he becomes more loving and affectionate towards his mother. He walks slowly over to his mother, teary eyed and holds his mother, clasping her face in his hands. You can really tell that Gertrude and Hamlet are affected by Hamlet's insanity as both of them seem to cry for most of the scene. The whole scene is a sharing of emotions. They kiss each other on the face; it is a connection between them both, and rather then a lust they both have for any sexual contact. They needed to connect physically in some way, after all they are mother and son. Hamlet then tells Gertrude that she must go to bed and tell no one about his secrets of how he will catch Claudius, his mother accepts Hamlets orders and gently kisses the side of his face, and he kisses her back. Hamlet then slowly walks over to the stale smelling body, picks up the heels of Polonius and gently drags the body off stage leaving traces of skin curdling blood. ...read more.

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