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In a letter to the Age, (26,1,09) titled Dreaming of a better day the writer conveys his point of view in a patriotic and discouraged tone that Australians should feel sympathy and sorrow towards Indigenous Australians on Australia Day.

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Introduction

In a letter to the Age, (26,1,09) titled "Dreaming of a better day" the writer conveys his point of view in a patriotic and discouraged tone that Australians should feel sympathy and sorrow towards Indigenous Australians on Australia Day. The writer opens the piece with the headline which appeals to justice, which shows how important the issue is to the writer and also allows the readers to agree with him. The argument begins with an emotive anecdote about how Australia has changed since the original owners of the land were here. Using emotive words such as "nightmare", "beautiful", "blissful and "heart-breaking" the writer shows just how passionate he is about Australia and Indigenous people and this encourages the readers feel the same way. ...read more.

Middle

The writer then uses sarcasm "how damn lucky for the rest of us", this ridicules Australians and furthermore evokes sorrow towards the "original owners" of this land. Finally, the editorial concludes with a solution by the writer stating what he is doing on Australia Day which is "mourning", using emotive and negative words such as "genocide", "wiping out", "destruction". The emotive and negative words furthermore develop the writer's point of view that the act of celebrating the landing of the First Fleet is ignorant and "heart-breaking". In contrast to the editorial's point of view that Australia Day is celebrated for all the wrong reasons, the Blog (The Age, 26/1/09) highlights the issue and argues that Australia Day is a day that average Australians can celebrate what it is to be "Aussie[s]" and the fact that we are living in the "lucky country". ...read more.

Conclusion

The argument then moves forward to all the things it is to be an Australian, by appealing to national identity and tapping into the reader's values and beliefs. Stating that the average Australian sees Australia day as a "day off from work" and a "chance to watch the cricket or tennis interrupted" and a excuse to have a plate of "BBQ'd meat products". The intention of this is to convince the readers and furthermore show Australia Day as a day of celebration to be in the "lucky country". Additionally, the writer uses a personal anecdote about his grandfather and how he came to Australia with nothing and managed to live a successful life in this "land of opportunity". This is used to show the writers point of view of Australia which he feels grateful and thankful that he lives here. Finally, the writer finishes with a solution and uses appeals to tradition and colloquial Aussi slang. ...read more.

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