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In Christa Wolf's Cassandra, the story of the fall of Troy is cleverly retold in a monologue that focuses on patriarchy and war.

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Introduction

Michael Lee English 1102 1/31/99 Paper 2 In Christa Wolf's Cassandra, the story of the fall of Troy is cleverly retold in a monologue that focuses on patriarchy and war. The novel tells the tale of the Trojan War through the eyes of Cassandra, who is the daughter of Priam and prisoner of Agamemnon. While reading the book, the reader must wonder what changes Troy is going through before and after the war. In the months leading up to the war, changes to Troy were already starting to develop as its tension with Greece increased. However, these changes didn't become obvious until after the war was over with. In the beginning, Troy was meant to be a perfect city built by the Gods. After it was taken over by humans, it was a proud and happy city that was full of freedom. The women in Troy were especially free, given most of the same freedoms as men were given. King Priam and Queen Hecuba ruled together and made mutual decisions. ...read more.

Middle

One part of war is to kill more people than your opponent, but you must keep your dignity in doing so. If the Trojans had succeeded in keeping the Greeks out of their city, then the Greeks wouldn't have viewed it as a total loss. This is because the Greeks turned the Trojans into one of their own kind deceptive, dishonest, and dishonorable. The Trojans no longer knew what they were fighting for. "Then we all forgot the reason for the war." (Wolf 68) They had two enemies-the Greeks and themselves. On one hand, they wanted to kill off the Greeks, but on the other hand, they are fighting a battle with themselves. In the battle with themselves, they don't realize that they are ostracizing their women and mirroring the Greeks. The main point of war is not to kill more people, but to make a statement in doing so. If the Greeks had made the Troy a mirror of Greece, then the Greeks would have won the real war no matter who kills more enemies. ...read more.

Conclusion

As the war went on, the Trojans began to implement more of the actions of the Greeks. This caused their morals to change for the worse, and become more like the morals of the Greeks. The Greeks' morals were considered barbaric and inhuman to the Trojans at the time, but little did they know that they were slowly becoming like their enemies. One example of this is the fact that the Trojan men started to separate from their women and go on their own. Public opinion changed and the men of society viewed women as inferior, and in a way, the men of Troy started to ostracize the women. Even King Priam started ignoring Hecuba and made political decisions without her. The war was of great significance to the Trojans for several reasons. For one thing, it changed their society for the worse. It also showed that the men should not have broken ties with their women. They may have lost the war and the city because of this. One thing the reader should learn from this novel is that Troy used to be the perfect city of equality, but changed for the worse to become like Greece. ...read more.

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