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In four separate paragraphs of about 100 words each write about: Dialects, Sociolects, Idiolects, and Register. Support you notes with examples.

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Introduction

LINGUISTICS In four separate paragraphs of about 100 words each write about: Dialects, Sociolects, Idiolects, and Register. Support you notes with examples. Dialect-A variety of a language, spoken in one part of a country (regional dialect), or by people belonging to a particular social class (social dialect or sociolect), which has some different words, grammar (specifically morphology and syntax), and/or pronunciation from other forms of the same language. In morphology (word formation), for example, in Mancunian English the word "barm cake" means "bread roll" and is not widely understood outside Greater Manchester. Grammar is another aspect in which dialects may differ. In Standard English, a speaker would say: "I was standing at the bus stop". ...read more.

Middle

Sociolect (social dialect) - A variety of a language (dialect) used by people belonging to a particular social class. The speakers of a sociolect usually share a similar socioeconomic and/or educational background. Sociolects may be classed as high (status) or low(status). For example - Sitting and drinking (high sociolect), Sittin' 'n' drinkin' (low sociolect). The difference between one sociolect and another can be investigated by analysing the recorded speech of large samples of speakers from various social backgrounds. The differences are referred to as sociolectal variation. Idiolect - The language system of an individual as expressed by the way he or she speaks or writes within the overall system of a particular language. In its widest sense, someone's idiolect includes their way of communicating; for example, their choice of utterances and the way they interpret the utterances made by others. ...read more.

Conclusion

Registers are usually characterized solely by vocabulary differences; either by the use of particular words, or by the use of words in a particular sense. Register is affected by three influences: field which refers to a subject or topic one is talking about, manner; which refers to the existent relationship between two people and mode; which refers to the difference between written and spoken modes. Register differs according to: lexis i.e. the appropriate vocabulary used in different situations such as: the register used for law is not the same as the register used in medicine; Grammar for example: long, complex sentences would be appropriate for legal documents but they would be inappropriate for a children's book; Phonology which is the pronunciation of spoken English i.e. sociolect. ?? ?? ?? ?? Gabriel Farrugia Ms. Maria Mifsud Tutorial Group 3.2 ...read more.

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