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In Save our children from the horrors of school sport how effectively does the author argue against compulsory school sport?

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Introduction

In 'Save our children from the horrors of school sport' how effectively does the author argue against compulsory school sport? The writer of 'Save our children from the horrors of school sport' uses various presentational devices in order to create a weighted argument in opposed to England's obsession of sport in schools. The title is already emotive with the use of words such as 'save' and 'horrors' as it is made to sound as if the children are being terrorised with the use of 'school sport' and adds emphasis to the situation. Moreover, the use of alliteration reinforces its emotive but informative impact on its readers. The article, which is written in first person, uses humour as this draws the readers in. Evidently, Harris sees England's obsession in sport as his teachers considered that the fact he was unable to do 'forward rolls' was a 'handicap' and would cause some sort of difficulties to gain an employment in the future. ...read more.

Middle

He felt that the 'sporting figures' which saw a correlation between compulsory sports and success on the 'international stage' was nonsense as he makes fun out of this belief with an emphatic contrast that he was told that PE was 'all that stands between lardy failure and the triumph of finely-toned Gods'. Harris effectively uses a scenario which some may be familiar with of being 'roundly humiliated by being picked last for football'. Evidently, he doesn't see a link between this 'misery' and a chance to achieve 'Olympic gold'. Overall, the scenario allows us to empathise for the situation he was once in and allows us realise how unimportant 'school sport' was for those who weren't exactly fond of doing so. Furthermore, Harris' use of alliteration once again adds emphasis of 'making sport synonymous' as it tended to 'put off even the people who were good at it'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Moreover, he mentioned how they spoiled sport by playing a game called 'Team For A Laugh' in order to make his point. In conclusion, the author successfully manages to argue his views of compulsory school sport and on how completely unnecessary it was to be obsessing over. However, since it is written in first person, it is mainly his own view which is rarely ever backed up by someone else's, probably an expert would have strengthened his argument. But he still manages to be successful in making his point, concluding with his belief that like in Germany, sport should be considered as 'pastimes best enjoyed by those who are good at them'. Overall, the article is well thought out and written as it even concludes with the use of informal language: 'Erm, not sure about that one, Trev', showing his confidence that England's beliefs of sporting are wrong. ...read more.

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