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In the beginning of the Great War the army was not a conscripted one. This meant that soldiers had to volunteer their services. As the British army was in constant need of new soldiers many methods were used to encourage the public to join the war effort.

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Introduction

Compare and Contrast the recruitment poems with those written from the trenches. In the beginning of the Great War the army was not a conscripted one. This meant that soldiers had to volunteer their services. As the British army was in constant need of new soldiers many methods were used to encourage the public to join the war effort. A widely used way of getting people to enlist was to use recruitment poems. Poets who had never actually fought in the war often wrote these poems. This is one of the distinguishing factors between recruitment and trench poems. I have looked at 'Fall In' by Harold Begbie and 'Who's for the game?' by Jesse Pope. Harold Begbie wrote one poem I have studied titled "fall in". The title immediately sets the tone for the poem, by saying the reader should fall into line in the army. This poem has 3 verses, each verse has 8 lines which all have an alternate rhyme scheme. This poem uses methods that make the reader feel that it is their duty to enrol in and if they don't they will be ashamed for the rest of their life. ...read more.

Middle

The use of rhetorical questions is very important in these poems, as they imply that there is no argument against enlisting. At the end of the first three verses the lines are very similar to each line in 'Fall In'. In this way these poems are similar, both poems also are very structured and do not exceed the scheme of the poem. Both of these poems are intended to be read quickly, and to leave an impression with the reader. I know this as both poems have powerful last lines, referring to the country and god. All the recruitment poems I have studied give the same reason for enlisting. This is that if you do not you will be an outcast in society. I think the promise of a lonely life would have pushed many people to help with the war effort. All the recruitment poems are very similar in their structure. Most are in short verses and have rhyme schemes. They are very regimented- like the army and leave an impression of pride for their country. Rhetorical questions are used frequently to impress a further need to enlist. ...read more.

Conclusion

This poem does have a structure - unlike 'dulce et decorum est'. This poem is quite similar to the first in the way that some lines rhyme and some do not. This poem uses rhetorical questions in the second verse, these question the need for war. This poem starts on one specific event but ends talking generally about the war. I think that recruitment and trench poems are completely different, in the ways they are structured, their views of the war and also the way their point is put across to the reader. I think that recruitment poems are generally more structured than trench poems. I also think that literacy devices are used more in recruitment poems, e.g. rhetorical questions. Recruitment poems often focus on the negative things that will occur if someone did not enlist, whereas trench poems say the negative things that will happen when you do enlist. Trench poems did not call on higher powers to tell the reader not to enlist but recruitment powers often refer to queen and country and god. I think that because trench poems were more structured and rhyming, made them easier to read and affiliate with for the average man on the street. I think that this made recruitment poems more successful than trench poems. Even though trench poems were closer to the truth. BY LAURA SMALE. ...read more.

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