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In the poem, Passed On written by Carole Satymurti, the poet illustrates the importance of a box filled with index cards, at the same time, she reminisces about her mother.

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Introduction

May 2000 Paper 1: Commentary on the poem Passed On In the poem, Passed On written by Carole Satymurti, the poet illustrates the importance of a box filled with index cards, at the same time, she reminisces about her mother. Through the detailed depiction of the memories that the index cards bring her, a sense of nostalgia is created. Carole presents her memories in a chronological order, such that it portrays events from when her mother was still alive to the poet's final acceptance of her mother's death. However, as the poem progresses, these organized patterns of thoughts, gradually break away from conformity, creating an outburst of freedom felt from her release from pain. At the end of the poem, Carole finally shows acceptance of her mother's death, at the same time reassuring the readers of her growth. This poem begins with Carole reflecting upon her past where she recollects the times when her mother "scribbled with a squirrel concentration" writing things down on the index cards, reflecting her mother's seriousness towards what she is doing. ...read more.

Middle

how to make, when to use" This paradox between the organizations shows the overwhelming outbursts of thoughts as they deem to be uncontrollable and hard to organize. The fragmented sentences on the card also increase the rhythm of the poem, creating a sense of urgency as the mother races against time to jot down every vital piece of information. Because of her mother's protectiveness, the author becomes overly dependent on them. "The cards looked after [her] and [she'd] shuffle them to almost hear her speak." Carole Satymurti wraps herself around her mother's past and hides in the box of cards as to her "the world was box shaped" and in there, every card had a solution to "every doubt or choice" she may ever have. Over time, the author begins to realize that the cards have "seemed to shrink" and the writings on the cards have begun to fade away. This forces the author to break away from the comfortable boxed up world that she hides in. ...read more.

Conclusion

The control her mother has on her slowly begins to fade away as "the smoke rose thin and clear, slowly blurred." However, the author does not completely break off all ties between her and her mother as she has "kept the box for diaries", keeping the memory of her mother but at the same time, allowing herself to live a new life free from restrictions. The act of burning the index cards also reflect the author's final acceptance of her mother's death, as if she is cremating her once again, letting the memory of her mother remain by her side but not as an overpowering force controlling her life and thoughts. The uneven lengths of each stanza in the poem shows a sense of development throughout as it begins with the past, moving to the present and finally ending with the aspiration of a bright new future of uncertainties as portrayed with the "blurred" imagery in the end. Subsequently, from this, the author grows to accept her mother's death and slowly moves away from her mother's protective safe environment and embarks on a journey into the unknown. Jie Ming Oh ...read more.

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