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In what ways did the lives of women change during the war as a result of their work outside the home?

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Introduction

In what ways did the lives of women change during the war as a result of their work outside the home? The lives of women changed enormously during World War Two. Up until 1939 women's role was in the home looking after their children and menfolk. They did all the domestic chores and their day resolved around washing cooking and cleaning. They were expected to have a hot meal on the table ready when the men came home from work. During the evening they would spend their time darning, knitting and sewing. Before the war, married women were not allowed to work because it was believed that once a woman married it was her duty to look after her husband, home and family. World War two opened up incredible opportunities for women. When the men left to go to war they took over the jobs that the men left behind. ...read more.

Middle

They eventually earned more than the men had received for the same job before the war. While working outside the home they were also responsible for their usual domestic duties and on the whole they surprised everybody, including themselves, at just how resourceful and successful they were. For some women the war brought on greater independence, the opportunity to train for skilled jobs and take pride in what they did. Women without family responsibilities, now away from home for the first time had more freedom. Some women were certainly very glad to escape from boring, poorly paid 'female' jobs. Thousands of maids, cooks and nannies were redirected to war work and often found that their earnings tripled. Many young women who would never otherwise have had the chance to leave home until they married revelled in their new found freedom and independence. The national press praised women for their incredible effort and as they gained the respect of the nation their confidence was boosted and this added confidence enabled them to carry on and show the world that they were an equal match to men. ...read more.

Conclusion

Women found this very difficult, they had had a taste of an independent fulfilling life and they were reluctant to meekly return to their old life. The divorce rate increased after the war, many people think that this is due to women finding their new independence and being used to not having men around as much, and being more than confident of being on their own. After the war, women found employment as secretaries, waitresses or in other clerical jobs. This is now known as the "pink collar" work force. The jobs were not as well paid, as enjoyable or challenging, but women did take them on as they either needed or wanted to keep working. In the 1960's more equal rights were given to women. And today, they are almost equal with men in the workplace and are rewarded with similar job opportunities to them. World war two changed women's lives forever. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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