• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14

James Joyce: An Exhaustion at the

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Gurpreet Singh 1st Period English Mr. Little December 5th, 2003 James Joyce: An Exhaustion at the "Araby" I doubt there are book logs that commence with a note directing a reader, specifically you, even though I get the impression from Mr. Little to whom riding between pairs of glasses suggesting that in order to gather a bounty against my beloved head I must be obliged to fathoming on how to receive topic sentences with cradling arms and craters of dimples (have to love formalities, even of those lolling head-stumps, after all, it keeps NATO all trite and content with tying bow ties as a substitute for tying "no comments" with the press, or if there are annotations, they habitually orbit around: NATO headquarters dinner order for "take out the Chinese" was grossly misunderstood). Nevertheless, off it goes: this specific book log was completed in a week's time past upon that of receiving an anthology of Joyce's works, and thus focuses on a signature piece that I would be akin to exhausting minus any previous impressions received from Joyce's complementary works as that of the portrait. The following is a hub of focus for a sole work that I first put my eyes on, one I inherently had the benefit of, and then again, a reassurance that Mr. Singh did not instigate a recall of Joyce's added works; they merely came after. And for all the rock we taste as Mother Earth, the preceding just came out as a declaration of copyrights as a liability against litigation funds (a perfectly fit moment to mutter a: my bad). Canadian navigator busy extolling virtues of Celine Dion. The foremost most moments of virtue. Yvannah Persuad. A pixie-like face. Stern. Brown eyes clouding with concern. A sharp detour in the upper folds of jaws, an overlapping tooth in the midst of twenty-eight more. Seven creases. Three under the eye of right. ...read more.

Middle

The pointed fingers: a repressive Dublin culture. The wisdom derived from rejection. We all achieve it at some time. Sometimes. Totally hammered after losing a game of "quarters" to Boris. An initiation of the quest for the ideal. The quest ends in failure but results in an inner awareness and a first step into manhood. On another level, the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for the story is told in retrospect by a man who looks back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight. As such, the boy's experience is not restricted to youth's encounter with first love. Rather, it is a portrayal of a continuing problem all through life: the incompatibility of the ideal, of the dream as one wishes it to be, with the bleakness of reality. This double focus-the boy who first experiences, and the man who has not forgotten - provides for the dramatic rendering of a story of first lust told by a narrator who, with his wider, adult vision, can employ the sophisticated use of irony and symbolic imagery necessary to reveal the story's meaning. The boy's character is indirectly suggested in the opening scenes of the story. He has grown up in the backwash of a dying city. Symbolic images show him to be an individual who is sensitive to the fact that his city's vitality has ebbed and left a residue of empty piety, the faintest echoes of romance upon the lust of effective strokes, and only symbolic memories of an active concern for God and fellow men. Although the young boy cannot comprehend it intellectually, he feels that the street, the town, and Ireland itself have become ingrown, self-satisfied, and unimaginative. It is a world of spiritual stagnation, and as a result, the boy's outlook is severely limited. Ignorant thus innocent. Lonely, imaginative, isolated. He lacks the understanding necessary for evaluation and perspective. ...read more.

Conclusion

With volunteers like Kathleen Willey There was one time with Margaret Thatcher I chased her 'round, but could not catch her No kinky stuff, not on your life I wouldn't, even with my wife And Jennifer Flowers' tale of woes Was paid for by my right-wing foes And Paula Jones, and those State Troopers Are just a bunch of party poopers I will not ask my friends to lie I will not hang them out to dry I did not do it last November But if I did, I don't remember I did not do it in the hall I could have, but I don't recall I never did it in my study I never did it with my dog, Buddy I never did it to Sox, the cat I might have once...with Arafat I never did it in a hurry I never groped Ms. Betty Currie There was no sex at Arlington There was no sex on Air Force One I might have copped a little feel And then endeavored to conceal But never did these things so lewd At least, not ever in the nude These things to which I have confessed They do not count, if we stayed dressed It never happened with a cigar I never dated Mrs. Starr I did not know this little sin Would be retold on CNN I broke some rules my Mama taught me I tried to hide, but now you've caught me But I implore, I do beseech Do not condemn, do not impeach I might have got a little tail But never, never did I inhale. (and now I implore you Mr. Kevin, to throw your ante against who this worshipper of NATO truly is, and oh yes, I did include topic sentences-I even bolded them for you, lol, and this time, in horror of getting my head chopped off, I attempted two manner in which to errr...express...myself, one being that of a snap-shot photo shoot, and the other of a constant stream) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level James Joyce section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level James Joyce essays

  1. Looking at the denouement of The Dead, discuss the emotional variety of Gabriel.

    he has never felt that way about anybody and henceforth he has never felt love. This realisation that he has never loved anyone before is an especially depressing thought for him given that he is married and at that stage of life to realise that you could die never having felt love could be a terrifying thought.

  2. An analytical study of 'The Pit and The Pendulum', 'An Encounter' and 'The Pedestrian', ...

    However, one feels that on reflection, after reading his work a subtle affection is undoubtedly apparent - perhaps Joyce's time spent in exile3 incubated an innate longing for the city - Dublin's entrapment being, perhaps, what fuelled this fascination with the petty happening of the city?

  1. What impression of Dublin and its people does James Joyce give in his story ...

    he was dead, so he was not so 'charitable' while he was alive; again, James signifies that the Church is only after your money. 'Araby' is set in the winter when it is cold, dark, dull, gloomy and this had a depressing effect, 'the houses had grown sombre', James says that the feeble street lamps can hardly light anything up.

  2. Discuss the idea of disappointment in ‘Araby’ and ‘An Encounter’.

    When in the bazaar he also realises that he is not that important, people ignore him, and he finishes by saying, 'I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burnt with anguish and anger.'

  1. The Significance of Irony in Brighton Rock

    They are, for instance, sexually immature - a fact both Rose and Pinkie admit; they also have similar ideology about religion; have grown up in a similar area and have little experience of the world. Pinkie, at first, is scared to admit this as he ironically calls Rose 'green', not

  2. The plight of the individual is most pertinently expressed through the plight of women ...

    This in itself is unsettling as she if wearing clothes which as supposed to be reserved for the Sabbath for an exploitative meeting in hope of financial gain. But the colours of her 'Sunday finery' are also relevant; she is wearing a 'blue serge' and a 'white blouse'.

  1. Analyse the main themes and narrative devices introduced in The Sister

    Secondly, Joyce shows how the Dublin Catholic Church has misused its power and has had a negative influence on the city. We first come across a result of this simony in the form of the boy protagonist. As the narrative unfolds, it becomes clear that the boy has been badly

  2. Joyce Intended Dubliners to betray the soul of that paralysis which many consider a ...

    this with the ?truculent, grey and massive? and ?solemn and copious? imagery of the priest. Perhaps the corrupt ?odour in the room? that is the priest, stands as Joyce?s microcosm for a corrupt Ireland? Dubliners, in its depiction of what one character refers to as ?Dear dirty Dublin,? is not

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work