• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Jane Austen's characters add humour and richness to the novel. Consider the role in the novel of the following: Mrs Bennet, Lady Catherine deBourgh, and Mr Collins.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jane Austen's characters add humour and richness to the novel. Consider the role in the novel of the following: Mrs Bennet Lady Catherine deBourgh Mr Collins I am going to consider the roles of Mrs Bennet and Mr Collins in the novel. I will do this by looking through the novel to find relevant information and make comments on it. Mrs Bennet Mrs Bennet is introduced into the story when she is talking to her husband about Netherfield Park being let to "a young man of large fortune." She seems excited at the prospect of a rich young man in the neighbourhood and is fixated with the idea that he will marry one of her daughters. Social etiquette at the time dictated that the man of the household should pay a courtesy visit to the new neighbour, but when Mr Bennet refuses to go she becomes very upset. The next day when the whole family gathers together Mrs Bennet announces that she hates Mr Bingley and is sick of talking about him because Mr Bennet will not go to visit him. ...read more.

Middle

Later in the novel when Lydia runs away with Mr Wicham, the full extent of her naivety is uncovered. Instead of worrying what will happen to Lydia's and the family's reputation she is insisting that Lydia must not get married until Mrs Bennet has told her the best place to buy muslin. This is a sign that Mrs Bennet is unable to take anything completely seriously. When Mrs Bennet hears that her brother Mr Gardiner has supposedly paid for Lydia's entire wedding, she does not see why he should not. She says that all they ever get from him is "a few presents". She also said that if Mr Gardiner did not have a family of his own they would have gotten all of his money. She has no sense of gratitude towards Mr Gardiner and for how much he has supposedly gone out of his way to pay for Lydia's future. Mr Collins Mr Collins in introduced to the story by way of his letter to Mr Bennet seeing if he could stay at Longbourne for a week. ...read more.

Conclusion

He writes that he thinks that Lydia dying would have ended better than whan is happening at that time. He doesn't speak of the mercy and forgiveness of God, like you would expect of a clergyman. I do not think that either of these characters main purpose in the story was to add humor, (although they do this well anyway.) I think the real reason they were added is to expose the type of person they are and say yes you can laugh at them but they have real problems and personality flaws. Mrs Bennet is too simple and Mr Collins is too obstinate. If Mrs Bennet was more educated the situation where Lydia ran away would not have been very likely to happen. Mr Collins is a clergyman, but yet he condemns people when they sin instead of telling them how God will forgive them if they ask for forgiveness.For example the letter he wrote to Mr and Mrs Bennet about Lydia. Jane Austen meant to air these flaws and make us see that you should be careful what you do and what you say. Rebecca Stone 11f English Coursework-Pride and Prejudice ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Jane Austen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Jane Austen essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Is it possible to see Elizabeth Bennet as a feminist heroine?

    3 star(s)

    This attitude is much like Mr. Collins' expecting, as most men would at the time, an acceptance from girl with notably few prospects (as picked up on by the Binglys), despite his attitude towards the affair communicating his beliefs that it would be 'a degradation'.

  2. How does Jane Austen present the themes of love and marriage in the novel ...

    Emma has changed in this chapter considerably; she accepts that Robert Martin is an appropriate suitor for Harriet. She is a bit disappointed, for she still wishes that Harriet could find a more higher class husband, but she realises that Harriet's connections are worse than Robert Martin's and that Harriet can only benefit from the match.

  1. Write a critical appreciation of the following passage, suggesting how far its styles and ...

    This is ironic because on looking back, Frank actually had his eyes set on Jane - he was secretly engaged to her - while both Emma and the reader may originally believe he had feelings for herself. Irony is later realised, in that Frank probably had intention of visiting Jane,

  2. To What Extent Is Northanger Abbey a Gothic Novel?

    Also, the novel has gothic settings and lexis. When Catherine is invited to go to Northanger Abbey she imagines " damp passages, its narrow cells and ruined chapel, were to be within her daily reach, and she could not entirely subdue the hope of some traditional legends, some awful memorials of an injured and ill-fated nun."

  1. Explain how each of the 4 settings has a profound effect on the characters ...

    The idea may reflect on the characters and how they use materialistic objects to substitute for what they are deprived of emotionally. The only discussions that take place at kellynch are of money, which emphasises kellynch's empty cold and depressing atmosphere.

  2. What do Mr Collins' comments on social activities such as dancing, backgammon and novel ...

    At one point he said 'I know little of the game at present, I shall be glad to improve myself' talking about whist, whilst sitting at a card table with Mr Wickham. Gambling is certainly no activity a rector should pride himself in.

  1. What does Jane Austen have to say about novel reading and how does what ...

    People enjoyed novels because they critically commented on 18th century society such as marriage, this meant female characters were involved which enticed more women to read these books. The novel, with its emphasis on behaviour and marriageability, targeted women readers whereas men mainly read poetry and drama.

  2. "In Batiste's determination to continue the struggle lies the essence of Blasco Ibaez's optimism. ...

    back to the same place they started their journey in the novel, they must leave and start afresh in another village. This suggests, to me the theme of hopelessness. The cyclical nature of the plot of which I will talk more about later in this essay is representative of a

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work