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Jane Austen's characters add humour and richness to the novel. Consider the role in the novel of the following: Mrs Bennet, Lady Catherine deBourgh, and Mr Collins.

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Introduction

Jane Austen's characters add humour and richness to the novel. Consider the role in the novel of the following: Mrs Bennet Lady Catherine deBourgh Mr Collins I am going to consider the roles of Mrs Bennet and Mr Collins in the novel. I will do this by looking through the novel to find relevant information and make comments on it. Mrs Bennet Mrs Bennet is introduced into the story when she is talking to her husband about Netherfield Park being let to "a young man of large fortune." She seems excited at the prospect of a rich young man in the neighbourhood and is fixated with the idea that he will marry one of her daughters. Social etiquette at the time dictated that the man of the household should pay a courtesy visit to the new neighbour, but when Mr Bennet refuses to go she becomes very upset. The next day when the whole family gathers together Mrs Bennet announces that she hates Mr Bingley and is sick of talking about him because Mr Bennet will not go to visit him. ...read more.

Middle

Later in the novel when Lydia runs away with Mr Wicham, the full extent of her naivety is uncovered. Instead of worrying what will happen to Lydia's and the family's reputation she is insisting that Lydia must not get married until Mrs Bennet has told her the best place to buy muslin. This is a sign that Mrs Bennet is unable to take anything completely seriously. When Mrs Bennet hears that her brother Mr Gardiner has supposedly paid for Lydia's entire wedding, she does not see why he should not. She says that all they ever get from him is "a few presents". She also said that if Mr Gardiner did not have a family of his own they would have gotten all of his money. She has no sense of gratitude towards Mr Gardiner and for how much he has supposedly gone out of his way to pay for Lydia's future. Mr Collins Mr Collins in introduced to the story by way of his letter to Mr Bennet seeing if he could stay at Longbourne for a week. ...read more.

Conclusion

He writes that he thinks that Lydia dying would have ended better than whan is happening at that time. He doesn't speak of the mercy and forgiveness of God, like you would expect of a clergyman. I do not think that either of these characters main purpose in the story was to add humor, (although they do this well anyway.) I think the real reason they were added is to expose the type of person they are and say yes you can laugh at them but they have real problems and personality flaws. Mrs Bennet is too simple and Mr Collins is too obstinate. If Mrs Bennet was more educated the situation where Lydia ran away would not have been very likely to happen. Mr Collins is a clergyman, but yet he condemns people when they sin instead of telling them how God will forgive them if they ask for forgiveness.For example the letter he wrote to Mr and Mrs Bennet about Lydia. Jane Austen meant to air these flaws and make us see that you should be careful what you do and what you say. Rebecca Stone 11f English Coursework-Pride and Prejudice ...read more.

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