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Looking at pg.45, how does Faulks foreshadow the devastation and horrors of World War One

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Introduction

"Looking at pg.45, how does Faulks foreshadow the devastation and horrors of World War One?" Page 45 of Sebastian Faulks Birdsong, holds a variety of language technique that foreshadow the horrors of World War One. I will be looking at the way Faulks uses setting/nature, imagery, and descriptive language to capture and signifying what the soldiers were going to experience in the forthcoming war. Faulks foreshadows the devastation of World War One using setting/nature. An example of this is when he uses a phrase which can be used to describe life in the trenches. "...superfluous decay, the rotting of matter into the turned dug earth with its humid, clinging soil." ...read more.

Middle

Faulks also foreshadows the horrors of World War One using imagery. An example of this is when he describes ways in which soldiers were attacked by the enemy. "air coagulated, thick and choking", which Faulks really used to describe the weather at the picnic trip, could symbolise the effect the mustard gas had on the soldiers when they were attacked. "air coagulated" and "choking" shows this because mustard gas dissolves the lungs and it literally drowns the person, making it hard to breath and making the soldier splutter and 'choke' because of the water. Faulks also foreshadows the attitudes of the soldiers during World War One using descriptive language. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Reabsorbed by the thirsting roots", this could be about the decomposing of the dead bodies. In conclusion, Sebastian Faulks uses a variety of language techniques that foreshadow the horrors of World War One. He foreshadows the devastation of World War One using setting/nature; he uses imagery to foreshadow the horrors of World War One; he also foreshadows the attitudes of the soldiers during World War One using descriptive language, and also uses descriptive language to foreshadow the devastation of World War One and the consequences many people would have to face because of the war. ?? ?? ?? ?? Arta Azemi De-Constructing Essay Ms Balfour 12C ...read more.

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