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Many issues led to Yeats love affair with Ireland souring, especially Maud Gonne and his dealings with her, the Elaine Gallery affair, the Death of Parnell and many others. This new sour affair with Ireland was easy seen.

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Introduction

Many issues led to Yeats love affair with Ireland souring, especially Maud Gonne and his dealings with her, the Elaine Gallery affair, the Death of Parnell and many others. This new sour affair with Ireland was easy seen. Later on in his career Yeats underwent a profound style change. The romantic wistfulness, the dreamy, decorative quality of much of his early verse now gave way to a manner of one more terse, astringent and masculine, which became apparent in a new volume; "The Green helmet and other poems", published in 1910, and even more strikingly evident in the next volume of poems "Responsibilities" (1914). "The fascination of whats difficult" and "the grey rock" are examples of this new style, which Yeats probably felt, with justification, to be better suited than his usual manner to the increasingly varied and public nature of his themes, but this remarkable new phase also drew from him some of the most magnificent love poems, such as the one that begins "she lived in storm and strife" from responsibilities. ...read more.

Middle

Here too he was casting himself as the survivor of a tradition. His adaptation of different poetic modes was seen in several poems (like "the two kings", "the three beggars", "The hour before dawn") combining a narrative form remininiscent of Ferguson with a pared down modern language suggesting pounds editorial pencil. Although himself, chose to dismiss "the two kings" as uselessly Tennysonian when reviewing the volume, it was carefully balanced in apposition to "the grey rock". Obscure as the result sometimes was, a powerful personal voice expressed itself through laceratingly direct imagery. There were also a group of poems for and about Gonne (" to a child dancing in the wind", "a memory of youth", "fallen majesty", "friends) But the collection centered on the public poems provoked by the Gallery dispute. For wby, Lane carried on the essential traditional of nobility and patronage, as parnell represented the nobility in politics; and the two were directly connected in "To a shade", again deliberately located in September 1913. ...read more.

Conclusion

But the most perceptive commentary came from Joseph hone . Hone asserted that the collective works of 1908 had ended a chapter; the importance of that publication was not that wby had said all he had to say, but that what he had to say would now be said differently. This had been hinted in the green helmet and "Synge and the Ireland of his time"; it was proved by responsibilities. Wbys search for a public had produced not only a new political viewpoint but an "individual protesting voice". It maybe that Synge saved mr Yeats for Ireland when he suggested that poets should use the whole of their personal life for material if again they would be read by strong men. Mr Yeats may not have found an Irish audience; but he is more than ever pre occupied with the thought of one, or he would not be writing these poems in which all his personal experience is bound up with Irish events ...read more.

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