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Material: Who's' for the game? - Jessie Pope, and Dulce et Decorum est - Wilfred Owen - Write a comparison of any two war poems you have studied, looking in particular at the poets' atitude to war.

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Introduction

Josie Richards - War Poetry Coursework - March 2002 Material: Who's' for the game? - Jessie Pope Dulce et Decorum est - Wilfred Owen Write a comparison of any tow war poems you have studied, looking in particular at the poets' atitude to war. Although both of these poems deal with the subject of war, the poets' attitude towards war differs dramatically. Jessie Pope's poem "Who's for the game?" supports war and encourages young men to go off and fight. The whole poem plays heavily on the young men's guilt and promotes the so-called glory of war. Wilfred Owen's poem "Dulce et Decorum est" takes a very different attitude towards war. Owen shows the reality and horror of war whilst also addressing those who encourage men to go off to war. He is very bitter towards poets like Jessie pope - the two poets did have a strong dislike for each other. Pope's poem is an extended metaphor. It compares war to a game or sport. It is a very personal poem as pope addresses each young man individually. ...read more.

Middle

"My friend, you would not tell with such high zest" The purpose of each poem also differs greatly. Pope writes to persuade men to go to war. Pope, not ever having experienced the fighting of war herself, encourages men to go to battle without really knowing the subject she is promoting. However, Owen's poem is in response to poems such as Pope's. Its purpose is to show poets like Pope the reality of war and its horror. His aim is to show these poets that war is not heroic or glorious and should not be promoted with such "zest." "Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge," The structure of each poem represents its meaning. "Dulce et Decorum est" has uneven stanzas, reflecting the uncertainty of the situation the soldiers were put in. ie. Not knowing what would happen next. It has 4 stanzas, each varying in length as the poem progresses. Pope's poem, however is a much more regular, evenly structured poem. It has 4 stanzas like Owen's poem but they are of equal length. ...read more.

Conclusion

In these descriptions, Owen uses different methods to emphasise the imagery, for example when he describes his friend being killed by the gas he uses a simile. "And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime" He also uses an extended metaphor of drowning when talking about the gas attack. He repeats the word drowning to give a dramatic effect. In the fourth stanza, when he is describing the real aspects of war, Owen uses very onomatopoeic words such as "gargling" to emphasize the disgusting conditions he had to grow accustomed to. "Of vile, incurable sores..." The rhythm of each poems also differs whilst representing the meaning. "Who's' for the game?" has a rhythm like a child's poem. It is simple but appealing to a cross-section of people from society. It makes the poem cheerful and easy to understand. "Dulce et Decorum est" is much more complex. It is trochaic therefore making the rhythm less noticeable. It makes it sound much more like a piece of prose or natural speech. Generally, these two poems have not much in common. They use different techniques to get their message across, have different moods and show two very different attitudes to war. ...read more.

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