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Men and women often think, and behave differently in relation to love. Write about 'to his coy mistress' and 'our love now', comparing how poets have presented men's, or women's attitudes

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Introduction

Men and women often think, and behave differently in relation to love. Write about 'to his coy mistress' and 'our love now', comparing how poets have presented men's, or women's attitudes 'To his coy mistress' was written in the seventeenth century, society then was patriarchal - where males were dominant - and women had little power or status, other than being the wives of rich, powerful men. Also, in this era, men were derogatory towards women, the women were seen as possessions of men, and as mere sexual prey. In the twentieth century, where 'our love now' was written, there is now an egalitarian society, brought on by feminism. In today's era, women are financially, and politically independent, 'our love now' is reflective of this. 'To is coy mistress' is one sided, and male dominated. The poets aim of the poem is to persuade his mistress to sleep with him, and is written in first (singular and plural) person. 'Our love now' is a male voiced poem, with female opinions. ...read more.

Middle

'Our love now' uses rhetorical devices to convey an argument. The extended metaphor of 'I said, remember how when you cut your hair, you feel different, and somehow incomplete. But the hair grows, before long it is always the same. Our beauty together is such' this is saying that whatever is wrong with their relationship, that given time, it can be fixed, back to how it was before. The female opinion of this is 'she said, after you've cut your hair, it grows again slowly. During that time, changes must occur; the style will be different. Such is our love now'. This extended metaphor is a depiction of the couples opposing views to their relationship, described as 'the tree is forever dead' (i.e. their relationship is dead). In the mans opinion, he feels that their relationship can be fixed, and that things will return to the same, whereas in the woman's opinion, things will never return to how their love was, and that things change with time. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are many similarities or differences between 'to his coy mistress' and 'our love now'. Both poems are about relationships, between men and women, and the love and attitudes of men and women in relationships. Both poems are spoken in the first person, and told from a man's perspective, so, therefore, are biased. 'To his coy mistress' and 'our love now' have different social and historical content. 'To his coy mistress' was written in the seventeenth century, where women were expected to be sub-missive to male domination. 'Our love now' was written in the twentieth century, where women and men expect mutual respect and where women make choices and opinions, and these are classed as important. I prefer 'our love now', because opinions are egalitarian, and the woman's perspective over the relationship is given. Emotions within 'our love now' are portrayed by the non-existence of a rhyme scheme, and how unpredictable the poem is. I also feel that the poem is better because of the social context within it, where the woman shows she is on level terms with her partner because his opinion starts the poem, and hers ends it. ...read more.

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