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Midsummer's night dream - Responding.

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Introduction

Midsummer's night dream Responding For unit two, we looked and explored the legendary play "Midsummer's night dream" by William Shakespeare. Midsummer Night's Dream was Probably composed in 1595 or 1596. this is one of Shakespeare's early comedies, but can be well-known from his other works in this group by describing it specifically as the Bard's original wedding play. Most scholars believe that Shakespeare wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream as a light entertainment to accompany a marriage celebration, and while the identity of the historical couple for whom it was meant has never been finally well-known, there is good textual and background evidence available to support this claim. At the same time, unlike the vast majority of his works (including all of his comedies), in concocting this story, Shakespeare did not rely directly upon existing plays, narrative poetry, historical records or any other primary source materials, making it a truly original piece. Most critics agree that if a youthful Shakespeare was not at his best in this play, he certainly enjoyed himself in writing it. ...read more.

Middle

Hermia loves Lysander but Egus wants to marry Demetruis who once loved Helena but now loves Hermia. 2. The caption for the second freeze frame was Puck mistakes Lysander for Demetrius and puts the juice in his eyes and Helena wakes Lysander thinking he is dead. 3. The third freeze frame was Helena wakes Lysander who falls in love with Helena. 4. Fourth freeze frame is when Puck turns Bottom's head into a ass's head and Tatiana falls deeply in love with him. 5. The caption for the fifth freeze frame is with all the lovers the marriage. A task that I enjoyed and which made it easier to understand the plot was when we were put into three different categories: lovers; mechanics and fairies. I was part of the lovers group. For this task, the main thing we were focusing on was cross-cutting (creating scenes and ten reordering the action by" cutting" forwards and backwards to different moments. For the first part I was playing the butler. ...read more.

Conclusion

Doing these tasks made it clearer about the plot and made us expand on the extract. For one of the tasks we were given a script with the lines from quince, we were then put into groups of five and we all had to learn 3 lines each. My lines were "And finds his trusty Thisbe's mantle slain; whereat with blade, with bloody blameful blade, he bravely broached his boiling bloody breast." This was the original version but to make it easier for us to understand we changed it to modern English "and finds his faithful Thisbe's mantle slain; at which with blade with bloody blameful blade, he pierced his boiling bloody breast." When I first read my lines it occurred to me that they use alliteration, which gave the suggestion to emphasize on those words while speaking. It also sounded very commanding and confident. This showed the contrasts of the different time periods by the modern English and Elizabethan English. When we performed this, we changed it and made it more interesting by using a chorus, which we learnt about in unit1. We used the chorus to make it more like poem and echoed the important words. ...read more.

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