• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Monologue for Aunt Reed on her deathbed

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Monologue for Aunt Reed, on her deathbed. How dare she turn up? This is my house. My house! She just appears as though nothing had happened. Out of pity perhaps. Maybe out of guilt. The return to Gateshead Hall can only be out of pity. It is the only logical reason. Why else would she return to me? She is mocking me. I cannot stand for this. I must get rid of her. I cannot let Jane see me like this. I am weak and she is strong. Yet I am still the ruler of this house. I ought to send her to the Red Room. She has not contacted me for several years and turns up as I am lying on my deathbed. It is a mockery. She wants to see me die and suffer. I do not feel guilty for what I did to her when she was younger and why should I? I should only feel guilty for the death of my beloved son John. ...read more.

Middle

Again I went to regard Jane so icily, I felt at once that my opinion of Jane - my feeling towards her - were unchanged and unchangeable. I know by my stony eye - opaque to tenderness, indissoluble to tears - that I am resolved to consider Jane bad to the last; because to believe Jane good would give me no generous pleasure: only a sense of mortification. I had to think that Jane had a dreadful life away from Gateshead and that we are the best thing that has ever happened to her. Jane has only returned to see me swallow my pride and take a step back. She may have come to see Eliza and Georgiana but that is far from the truth. There is more to it. She is hiding something. She is not telling us what she wants. She has not told us where she has been these past several years but she only wants to know about us. ...read more.

Conclusion

How could I leave my family like this? They will be frowned upon by God and they will separate themselves from each other. My time is to surely be up within the next few days. If it is not the feud between my own daughters, Eliza and Georgiana, that killed me, it would be the fact that my husband's favourite niece was sitting beside me, acting all innocent, not actually caring if I die or not. I had to get Eliza, Georgiana and Jane away from me. It is torture. The squabbling is driving me mad. The lamp faded as did the life within me. I am getting weaker. The flame is slowly dying out. I decided to drown out the sound of the women and began to think of John. Oh, if he is here right now, it would make me feel much better. He is the light in my life. The fabric of the family. And how this family has collapsed without him. I am now leaving this all behind. I shall meet my husband and begin my new life. ?? ?? ?? ?? Vikesh Shah Word Count: 1,060 - 1 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. Jane Eyre. We would like to show you Jane Eyres character and ...

    It became popular in the late Victorian Era, following the success of Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, in 1764. Since that time, gothic literature has become very influential. Some elements that are typically gothic include ancient prophecies, mystery and suspense, supernatural events, dreams and visions, violence, and a gloomy or even desolate setting.

  2. Analysis of passages and Mr Rochester in "Jane Eyre".

    There is a romantic and passionate image which contrasts a Gothic setting. The romantic voice is supernatural. Thus, her search for the voice she has heard equals the messages God sent. The passage is extremely descriptive with many adjectives 'dark', 'void' and nouns such as 'loneliness' and 'hush'.

  1. Explore the presentation of obsession in men in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and ...

    makes the reader question as to whether Rochester's love of Jane is real, or if he is just caught up in the moment and the possibility of loosing Jane and his control over her. In comparison, Parry in Enduring Love calls Joe and says, "I feel it too.

  2. Ms Eyre has a very strong religious faith which helps her choose the right ...

    The moral guidance that Helen gives Jane marks the beginning in her reconsideration of her outlook on life. It is now that she understands that she ?should love Mrs Reed.? As Helens explains that ?life appears too short to be spent nursing animosity.? As the relationship between the two girls develops we see a definite neutralisation of Jane?s passion.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work