• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Notes on the blank verse of Christopher Marlowe.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� AC����@�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0�9bjbj�2�2 (N�X�X0/�������������������8� �<�Uv::::::::�������$�R���:::::���::���:�:�:��:�������:. `�K{���:^��%0U�� � � �������� �� ::�:::::��� Notes on the Blank Verse of Christopher Marlowe "Marloe was stabd with a dagger, and dyed swearing" A MORE friendly critic, Mr. A. C. Swinburne, observes of this poet that "the father of English tragedy and the creator of English blank verse was therefore also the teacher and the guide of Shakespeare." In this sentence there are two misleading assumptions and two misleading conclusions. Kyd has as good a title to the first honour as Marlowe; Surrey has a better title to the second; and Shakespeare was not taught or guided by one of his predecessors or contemporaries alone. The less questionable judgment is, that Marlowe exercised a strong influence over later drama, though not himself as great a dramatist as Kyd; that he introduced several new tones into blank verse, and commenced the dissociative process which drew it farther and farther away from the rhythms of rhymed verse; and that when Shakespeare borrowed from him, which was pretty often at the beginning, Shakespeare either made something inferior or something different. 1 The comparative study of English versification at various periods is a large tract of unwritten history. ...read more.

Middle

Like to the shadows of Pyramides (Tamburlaine) and the final and best version: Shadowing more beauty in their airy brows Then have the white breasts of the queen of love (Doctor Faustus) and compare the whole set with Spenser again (F. Q.): Upon her eyelids many graces sate Under the shadow of her even brows, a passage which Mr. Robertson says Spenser himself used in three other places. 8 This economy is frequent in Marlowe. Within Tamburlaine it occurs in the form of monotony, especially in the facile use of resonant names (e.g. the recurrence of "Caspia" or "Caspian" with the same tone effect), a practice in which Marlowe was followed by Milton, but which Marlowe himself outgrew. Again, Zenocrate, lovlier than the love of Jove, Brighter than is the silver Rhodope, is paralleled later by Zenocrate, the lovliest maid alive, Fairier than rocks of pearl and precious stone. One line Marlowe remodels with triumphant success: And set black streamers in the firmament (Tamburlaine) becomes See, see, where Christ's blood streams in the firmament! (Doctor Faustus) 9 The verse accomplishments of Tamburlaine are notably two: Marlowe gets into blank verse the melody of Spenser, and he gets a new driving power by reinforcing the sentence period against the line period. ...read more.

Conclusion

not unlike caricature This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ /707�7�788�8�8�8�8f9g9�9�9�9�9������������h*a�h*a�OJQJh*a�h*a�CJOJQJ%h*a�h*a�OJQJfHq� ����)h*a�h*a�CJOJQJfHq� ����h*a�h�RS h�RSh*a�1234hij T�n����<stu���,]�������������������������������gd�RS07�9�����O{���rs�����0Ughi���� �����������������������������gd�RS : ; a � � � � ""?"h"i"j"�"�"�"�"�"�"##A#S#T#U#]#^#�#�����������������������������gd�RS�#�#�#�#c&d&�&�&�&&'R'S'T'u'v'�'�'�'(.(/(2(--K-�-�-�- .7.�����������������������������gd�RS7.8.9.|.}.�.�. / / /f/�0�0�0�011N1�1�1�1�1&2'2Z2�2�2�2�2�2�����������������������������gd�RS�2�3�3�3�3�3�3+5,5U5�5�5�566607�7�7�7�78888�8�8��������������������������$a$gd*a�$a$gd*a�gd�RS�8�8�8�8�8�8�8g9h9i9j9�9�9�9�9�9�9����������������gd�RS$a$gd*a�$a$gd*a�&1�h:p�RS��/ ��=!�'"�'#��$��%��D@�D NormalCJ_H aJmH nHsH tHDA@�D Default Paragraph FontRi�R Table Normal�4� l4�a� (k�(No ListDZ@�D �RS Plain TextCJOJQJ^JaJ4@4 *a�Header ���!4 @4 *a�Footer ���!`�o"` *a�watermark header$a$CJOJQJfHq� ����N�o2N *a�watermark footer$a$ CJOJQJ�1N����r�V�:���9� �#7.�2�8�9!"#$%&�9 //0/�/�/00�0�0�0�0h1j1�1�1�1��alex��RS*a��@0/�$��1P@��Unknown������������G��z ��Times New Roman5V��Symbol3&� �z ��Arial7&� � �VerdanaG5�� �����h�MS Mincho-�3� fg?5� �z ��Courier New"1���h� �F� �F� �F�'��'�$�������4N/N/3�� H�?�������������������RS��TCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedalexalex�� ��Oh��+'��0`��� |�� �� ( 4@HPX�sUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedualexewoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedu>Downloaded from Coursework.Info - http://www.coursework.info/is Normal.dotfalexl.d2exMicrosoft Word 10.0@@��4{��@��4{��@��4{���'�� ��Õ.��+,��D��Õ.��+,��`���H����� ���� � ��UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedo�/�N/A Titled@���+K_PID_LINKBASE CopyrightDownloaded FromCan RedistributeOwner�A4http://www.coursework.comcoursework.comehttp://www.coursework.com -No, do not redistributecoursework.com/ !"#$%&'����)*+,-./����1234567����9:;<=>?��������B��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Root Entry�������� �FP[ K{��D�1Table��������(WordDocument��������(NSummaryInformation(����0DocumentSummaryInformation8������������8CompObj������������j������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���� �FMicrosoft Word Document MSWordDocWord.Document.8�9�q ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Christopher Marlowe section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Christopher Marlowe essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    &amp;quot;Marlowe is not only a great poet but also a great dramatist. His speeches ...

    as a complete surprise and once again effortlessly allows the actor to pour emotion into the character. For a while after, Faustus' speech begins moving faster, aided by the sibilance of the following line, "Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven" It is almost impossible not to speed that line

  2. What does the play show us about attitudes to sin and damnation?

    no longer proud, but he is afraid to turn to God and despairs of receiving His mercy. The play shows that despair was thought to be the worst sin of all from Faustus' suicidal thoughts. Suicide was a direct result of despair and treated very seriously.

  1. The tragical history of 'Doctor Faustus', which followed in the wake of 'Tamburlaine', is ...

    Aristotle calls the cause-and-effect chain leading from the incentive moment to the climax the "tying up" (desis), in modern terminology the complication. He therefore terms the more rapid cause-and-effect chain from the climax to the resolution the "unravelling" (lusis), in modern terminology the d�nouement.

  2. Do Renaissance texts deal primarily with Renaissance concerns, or with universal human emotions and ...

    If we take the dragon to represent the Roman Catholic Church, Spenser's views are clear. The knight first sees the monster when his 'glistring armour (symbolic of Christianity's struggle) made / a little glomming light' allowing him to see the 'ugly monster plaine' (1.121).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work