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Poem Analysis: The Second Coming by W.B.Yeats

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Introduction

Poem Analysis: "The Second Coming" by W.B.Yeats The poem "The Second Coming" written by William Butler Yeats is full of imagery, the uses of exquisite diction, language styles such as personification and hyperbole, as well as a lot of symbolism. The first stanza of this poem described the catastrophes of this world. The word gyre in the first line symbolized history, or the life cycles of men. As a gyre turns bigger and bigger while keeping its original shape, which is round, it means that even though everything, like technology keeps on improving, human nature and the lives that we live never does. History keeps on repeating itself, and human never learn from their mistakes. This gyre also represents a whirlwind, or a storm that shakes the whole world. ...read more.

Middle

Second coming is most often linked with Jesus' coming back for the final judgment, or as we call it "the end of the world". Yeats used this second coming as a revelation of why all those catastrophes happen in the world, as an answer to the unanswered questions. However, in this stanza Yeats also mentioned a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi, the spirit and soul of the universe in which the human race preserved its past memories. In order to understand more about the meaning, we must first refer to the diction. In this line Yeatrs used the word vast, meaning large... Then, he moved on to describing a sphinx, which was obviously some kind of a magical creature representing the darker side of the world. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, the line itself could also mean the start of something new and something obviously bad... The last line, as the finale of the poem, was again a reference derived from the Holy Bible. Again, Yeats used the word slouches that suggests a slow movement. Yeats also mentioned Bethlehem, the holy city where Jesus the Messiah was born... Perhaps he was referring that this rough beast, whatever it was, was going to be the second messiah... That it is what the polluted world deserve rather than salvation and goodness. In a way, Yeats were comparing and leveling both the first messiah, Jesus Christ, with what he thought or suggest is going to be the second messiah, a rough and evil beast. ...read more.

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