• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Poetry Analysis of W. H. Auden's "In Memory of W. B. Yeats"

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Poetry Analysis of W. H. Auden's "In Memory of W. B. Yeats" Being one of the greatest poet in the modern world and a major figure devoting to the Celtic Twilight, which is a trial and a "popular desire for a revival of Irish traditional culture" (Kelen 32), William Butler Yeats died in January, 1939. Meanwhile, it was only eight months before the outbreak of World War II and the whole Europe was on the edge of the war - there were revolutions within the Continent and people got scared and considered themselves in a war. In Wystan Hugh Auden's "In Memory of W. B. Yeats", Auden makes use of an elegy to state the fact of the death of a great poet and moreover, takes the readers to a wider political context focusing on the extent of effectiveness of poetry in time of tumult. In my view, Auden delicately divides the focus of the poem into two levels, the superficial level (the fact of Yeats' death) and the in-depth level (the effectiveness of the poetry in relation to the political context). The two levels are evenly distributed to the three sections of the poem so that even though different sections carry different meanings, they form cohesion. In the first section, Auden states the fact of Yeats' death on an intense cold day by making use of imagery such as the "frozen brooks" (line 2), the "deserted airports" (line 2) ...read more.

Middle

Poetry, in my view, has its own implication that exceeds its literal level of meanings. Louis Macneice argues in his book, The Poetry of W. B. Yeats, that "art [is] [certainly] [not] for art's sake" (18) as he believes that "a poet like W. H. Auden should reassert that a poem must be about something" (Macneice 18). He further comments that a poem is "more of a poem if it fulfils its business of corresponding to life" (Macneice 193). Personally, I agree with the statement as it is my belief that poetry cannot stand on its own as a form of literature - it always reflect the thought, intention, feelings, opinion and stand of the poets. For example, in Yeats' poem "A Coat", the poem cannot be just about "a coat" but also reflect the poet's disappointment about the "critic['s] misinterpretation of the poet's work" (Kelen 34). As poem is "more than a poem" if it has something related to the life of human beings, poetry should be capable of making something happen. Referring back to the poem, Auden, in the last two stanzas of the poem, stresses the value of poetry at critical time by showing the readers its power to transform despair into hope - through the nourishing of the "farming of a verse" (line 59), "a vineyard [can] [be] [made] [out] of the curse" (line 60). ...read more.

Conclusion

By "teach[ing] [him] how to praise" (line 66), Auden intends to give the message that it is through the spreading and singing of poetry can those people (who consider themselves 'free') know the way to respect their life, live a life to the full and celebrate the coming and completion of each day even though they are living in hardship. In fact, the last stanza serves as the same function like the description of transformation from "curse" into "vineyard", and from "distress" to "rapture" in the previous stanza. All the components from the two stanzas work well with each other to reinforce and put emphasis on Auden's point of the role of poetry as to inspire people at time of distress. In conclusion, Macneice comments that "Yeats did not write primarily in order to influence men's actions but he knew that art can alter a man's outlook and so indirectly affect his actions" (192). I agree with this statement as we can see from this poem Auden's stand on the value of Yeats' poetry - although the situation in Ireland remained constant despite Yeats' devotion to Irish poetry, Auden believes that poetry, including that of Yeats', is capable of transforming the mental and spiritual outlook of human beings so that when they are hopeful and passionate for their life and future, they act more positively and contribute to a world with peace and hope. This is the time when poetry really makes a difference to the world. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level W.B. Yeats section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level W.B. Yeats essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Discuss ways in which Yeats presents the experience of Irish people in Easter 1916. ...

    4 star(s)

    He makes it all sound and unreal, and maybe theatrical, with the use of the word "song", "comedy" and "part". He makes out that the whole thing is not reality and that it is not actually happening. This may possibly be what he is trying to think to himself because

  2. Language and Literature Assignment. Analyse 'The Stolen Child' By W.B Yeats.

    As the rhyme scheme shows, lines one to four have the same pattern of alternating rhymes, highland/lake and island/wake. Then rhyming couplets are used to complete the stanza, rats/lats, cherries/berries and so on. All of the end rhymes used are masculine rhymes.

  1. William Butler Yeats' poem "The Second Coming" is filled with metaphoric imagery that reflects ...

    The phrase, "The ceremony of innocence is drowned;" is a very interesting line. It does not suggest a loss of innocence.

  2. Discuss with reference to at least three poems, Yeats' treatment of Irish Concerns.

    in which Yeats writes "For England may keep faith / For all that is done and said" which means that even though the death of these people in the rising showed some advancement, the advancement was not great enough to justify the loss of human life.

  1. How effective is W.B Yeats in cautioning the modern reader on the melancholic, the ...

    not be so good and the storm views are very symbolically displayed as we feel that his future maybe rough. From the last line we get the symbol of death, as the word murderous is mentioned followed by innocence - (Out of the murderous innocence of the sea)

  2. The Life And Poetry Of William Buttler Yeats

    England was trying to destroy all Irish literature in an attempt to anglicize Ireland through a ban on the Gaelic language. O'Leary's nationalism and opposition to violence impressed many people including Yeats. These views helped shape political views that Yeats would hold for the rest of his life.

  1. In 1936 Yeats wrote, "I too have tried to be modern". How does his ...

    The meter of the poem is very loose and it gives the illusion that it is written in free verse. It is however written in a very irregular iambic pentameter. This compliments the subject of anarchy and chaos. The last two lines of the first stanza are critical of the personalities of his times.

  2. To What Extent Was the Failure of the Easter Rising Due To Internal Divisions?

    to be free of alien rule.3 Several events laid the building blocks for the Easter Rising of 1916, all of which had bearing on what would take place. Firstly, the centuries of national oppression by British landlords and increasing capitalism had led to the formation, in a Dublin timber yard, of the Irish Republican Brotherhood or I.R.B.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work