• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Practice Commentary This passage taken from Denton Welch's Maiden Voyage

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Avelina Singh English S1 06.12.04 Practice Commentary This passage taken from Denton Welch's Maiden Voyage, introduces the readers to the main character (whose name is not mentioned) in a place that is not well known to the main character. Through the use of foreshadowing, symbolism, effective setting and characterization the author is able to successfully display a situation where an adolescent's rebelliousness leads him into trouble and unexpected events. This passage begins with one of the characters, Mr. Butler, telling the main character, "Foreigners are not very popular here." This very first line of the passage acts as a great opening sentence as it foreshadows the horrifying event that follows and it sets up the ominous and menacing mood of the passage. However this sentence is written so that it is an understatement and thus even though it still foreshadows the event that follows in a subtle way, it does not decrease the effect of that event has on the readers. If the foreshadowing had been made more obvious like, "Don't go outside or else they will kill you." ...read more.

Middle

In the starting the villa in which the main character is staying is said to be surrounded by poplar trees that are tall and thin and are planted in straight lines. This gives the readers the feeling that these trees act as barriers between the villa and the Chinese city that lies outside and maybe even guards the people living inside the villa from the outside dangers. Apart from this it gives a sense of why the main character feels imprisoned. Then when the main character sneaks out of the villa and walks along the sandy lane that leads to the country the surrounding area is described in such a way that is seems to have a life of its own. The stunted bushes are said to squeak and grate linguistically as the wind passes through them indicating that the bushes have a language of their own. The dust and sand are described as pillars and scarves making them similar to real civilization and makes the readers feel as if they have entered another world similar to their own. ...read more.

Conclusion

These two lines let the readers know that the main character prefers to be independent but also that he is spoiled as he likes to do things his way and his way only. Therefore when Mr. Butler suggests that stay at the villa he feels imprisoned and is furious. When his curiosity takes the better of him he leaves the villa quietly just to explore the country. His curiosity also takes over him when he observes the black speck at some distance. When he realizes that the object is actually a human head he is appalled but at the same time he is unable to take his eyes of the head. At this point in the passage the readers get the feeling that the main character is not as strong as he seems to be. He feels trapped and is reluctant to go back to the place where the head because he knows that he will be overcome by curiosity again. So this rebelliousness of his leads him into trouble. Therefore through the use of foreshadowing, symbolism, effective setting and characterization the author is able to successfully display a situation where an adolescent's rebelliousness leads him into unexpected trouble. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Fyodor Dostoevsky section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Fyodor Dostoevsky essays

  1. The extract taken from the Australian novel, 'The Battlers' is the opening of the ...

    'Now the wind was thunderous as city traffic,' here the author draws a comparison between the wing and the city traffic. The wind is being referred to being noisy such is city traffic and also like the city traffic it may be dangerous causing damage to the natural surroundings.'The vicious

  2. The Black Cat

    At length, I even offered her personal violence. My pets, of course, were made to feel the change in my disposition. I not only neglected, but ill-used them. For Pluto, however, I still retained sufficient regard to restrain me from maltreating him, as I made no scruple of maltreating the

  1. Could I Have Lived My Life Differently? : The Diary of Bigger Thomas.

    it was Jan who told him to take the trunk downstairs, for the depot. When Bigger returns, he feels a stronger impulse to leave town, but he convinces himself that he is strong enough to pull the whole thing off.

  2. The Black CatFor the most wild, yet most homely narrative which I am about ...

    The words "strange!" "singular!" and other similar expressions, excited my curiosity. I approached and saw, as if graven in bas relief upon the white surface, the figure of a gigantic cat. The impression was given with an accuracy truly marvellous.

  1. The Road To Jerusalem

    He never went back to Antioch, and died in Italy in 1111. Tancred had spent his time wisely, building the Principality of Antioch. He also married wisely, taking Cecilia, daughter of King Philip of France, as bride. The match had been arranged by Bohemond.

  2. Usage of Characterization In Ryonosuke Akutagawa's Rashomon

    With time though, the protagonist does eventually decide to compromise his morals, and he did not even have to "wonder whether he should starve to death or become a thief. Starvation was so far from his mind that it was the last thing that would have entered it." (Akutagawa 39).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work