• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Remind yourself of the passage in Chapter 14 from I know it well; therefore I proceed almost as freely(TM) to the end of the chapter. Discuss the significance of this passage in your reading of the novel.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Remind yourself of the passage in Chapter 14 from 'I know it well; therefore I proceed almost as freely...' to the end of the chapter. Discuss the significance of this passage in your reading of the novel. In the course of your answer: * Look closely at the effects of the writing in the passage(s) you have chosen: * Comment on ways in which your chosen passage(s) to the novel's methods and concerns. In this particular chapter, Rochester chooses to confined in Jane- 'I know it well; therefore I proceed almost as freely as if I were writing my own thoughts in a diary...' without 'giving himself away' he proceeds to hint at this 'past existence' to Jane without either one really understanding why. Rochester states that he finds it 'impossible to be conventional' with Jane, and thus 'talks like Sphynx' to subliminally tell Jane that he believes to be in love with her. ...read more.

Middle

He explicitly states that 'why should I (reform), if I can get sweet, fresh pleasure?' to Jane, allowing the conversation to become increasingly odd between governess and master and goes against the norm of Victorian convention and Jane clearly does not understand Rochester's intentions- 'to speak the truth, sir, I don't understand you at all: I cannot keep up the conversation, because it has got out of my depth...' Rochester adores Jane for her 'untainted' 'stainless' youth, which compared to himself is a complete contrast. While Jane remains innocent and young, Rochester remains experienced and sinful-unless he repents and gives up Jane. When he addresses 'a vision' and 'folding his arms, which half extended, on his chest, he seemed to enclose in their embrace the invisible being,' this further suggests his want for Jane, as previously and throughout the novel Jane is referred to as a 'fairy' or 'elf', Rochester's actions deliberately suggest that he wants Jane to realise his affection of her and refers to her silently as a gothic or supernatural being that he wants to have and embrace. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, Jane states that 'You are human and fallible,' and begins to humanise Rochester to her level '...the divine and perfect alone can be safely entrusted (with power),' she brings down Rochester and makes him imperfect again and suggests that he is capable of being hurt like everybody else. Bront� also humanises Rochester by making him concerned of where Jane is going and asking, he also implies that he has been watching her 'I see you laugh rarely; but you can laugh very merrily,' Bront� makes Rochester something capable of affection and judges Jane's character. 'I see at intervals the glance of a curious sort of bird through close-set bars of a cage: a vivid, restless, resolute captive is there; were it but free it would soar cloud high,' Rochester suggests that Jane's passionate nature is repressed by religion and 'Lowood constraint' and from this experience at Lowood she fears to 'smile too gaily, speak too freely or move too quickly' in the presence of a man, Rochester wants Jane to show her passionate nature and knows that she wants to too. 792 words ?? ?? ?? ?? Michelle Jones VIT ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. Jane Eyre. We would like to show you Jane Eyres character and ...

    Religion is very important part of this section. There are also lots of Romantic and Gothic elements. THE FERNDEAN SECTION Coming back to find her lover she gets into Ferndean the last part of the scene. She finds Rochester blind and harmed. He is not powerful and well-set anymore.

  2. Analysis of passages and Mr Rochester in "Jane Eyre".

    Right at the beginning of the book in the second chapter, Bronte sets the mood of the story through the instance of the red room. It emits weary noises and has a mirror which distorts Jane's appearance. Jane's uncle died there and she imagines his ghost now haunts the room.

  1. Explore the presentation of obsession in men in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and ...

    This suggests that Joe is completely naive to his situation and therefore he is scared by what is happening to him. He takes it upon himself to control the situation through the purchase of a gun. In Jane Eyre, St John does begin to gain some control over Jane and

  2. Analysis of the Tension in Chapter XXXVI

    Whilst Jane describes the journey there is a slow build up of tension as Jane 'nears [her] bourne' and she describes the landscape becoming 'mild' and 'pastoral'. We can see Jane's excitement and expectation as her 'heart leapt up' and 'fell again'.

  1. From your reading of Chapters 1, 2 and 26 of Jane Eyre, as well ...

    In "The Yellow Wallpaper", as the narrator falls into madness - and particularly at the end of the novel when she has succumbed to it entirely - Gilman depicts her 'creeping by daylight' about her room, 'crawling' on the floor, 'round and round and round', after having the narrator herself

  2. Jane Eyre - Development of Jane's Characters as a Child.

    However, Jane does find comfort in Bessie, who begins to act as a mother figure and is Jane?s only source of consolation and affection. Although Bessie seemed to be harsh at earlier points in the novel, her support of Jane during this time (and acknowledgement that she prefers Jane over the other children), make Mrs.

  1. People talk of natural sympathies From their first meeting, Jane and Rochester are well-matched. ...

    His arrival is somewhat of an anti-climax, there is no warmth brought by him and no thanks to Jane for her concentration throughout the scene. The hint of his Byronic characteristics creates a certain appeal for Jane. She is reflecting on the man she has just seen, she describes him as ?masculine, dark, strong, stern?.

  2. How effective is Chapter One as an introduction to the methods and concerns of ...

    She explains it clearly and vividly as if it were yesterday, showing how much this part of her life affected her. She is honest about it and hides nothing that happened to her, even if thee events were embarrassing or if they relive moments in Jane's life that she found saddening.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work