• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Rime of the Ancient Mariner - Beginning with a close analysis of the extract, consider the view that the gothic elements provide some of the poem's finest moments.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Beginning with a close analysis of the extract, consider the view that the gothic elements provide some of the poem's finest moments. Charles Tomlinson scrutinises the Rime of the Ancient Mariner 'as a refined tale of terror, and exercise in poetic heightening of the Gothic...at a deeper and more psychological level'. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner has been acclaimed to be one of many original works of Gothic literature along side Horace Walpole's novel 'The Castle of Otranto', because of its supernatural, horrific and romantic elements that are brought together within its narrative and language. The Mariner's killing of the albatross, the terrifying death of his shipmates, and the grotesque descriptions of the supernatural spirits are chief gothic mediums in the Rime of the Ancient Mariner that perhaps intend to develop the story. From the very first lines of the extract in Chapter 4 it is coherent that as the Ancient Mariner drifts in the ocean the natural world becomes more threatening with supernatural and uncanny facets. ...read more.

Middle

and infact there is one or thousands of other living 'things' in his natural surroundings, which he soon comes to appreciate by blessing. Another simple gothic technique that Coleridge implies is the use of exclamation; for instance 'The many men, so beautiful !' emphasises his despise for the dead soldiers who are peaceful and calm, something that he longs for as he believes death is the only way to be rid of his damnation and release his soul. The enjambment within the first stanza 'never a saint took pity on/My soul in agony' shows a clear differentiation of the saint that the Mariner holds in a high devout perspective and that he seeks sympathy or mercy from, and the connotation that the devil is in hold of his cursed soul because of his sinful actions. This metonymic image as well as the sailors' corpses that refuse to rot, with their open eyes cursing him continuously, provokes the idea that the visible manifestation of the living death awaits him. ...read more.

Conclusion

From the opening lines of the poem, it is foreseeable that the mariner's 'glittering eye' has captured the wedding guest possessing him to listen, just as the reader is enchanted too. Although the image illustrated in the reader's mind that the persona is unnaturally old or the association the 'glittering eye' has with supernatural stories and fairy tales, it is also prominent that the it has connotations with the 'evil eye'. This in some perspective forebodes the misfortune the mariner and sailors experience during their voyage and moreover accentuates the damnation his soul and eyes possess. To conclude I believe that Coleridge's use of Gothic elements is what makes the poem so astonishing and unique. Its technical language heightens the emotion and exaggeration in the poem. The grotesque and supernatural components are what keep the reader transfixed and possessed throughout and after reading the poem. Moreover this all contributes to the fact that most of the finest moments of the poem are because of its gothic fiction. The poem is more than 'gothic curiosity', but infact one of the most discussed epics of its times known for its gothic fiction. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Poets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Poets essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Journeying in Hardy's "At Castle Boterel"

    5 star(s)

    and "We had just alighted" soon gives way to the heavy alliteration of "When he sighed and slowed", literally slowing the line as the once "sturdy pony" of their relationship surrenders to fatigue. Similarly, the twin iambs of "foot-swift/ foot-sore", emphasised by unusual spacing and onomatopeia, succintly convey the fleeting exhiliration of first love, soon subsiding to jaded weariness.

  2. The Glass Jar (Gwen Harwood) Analysis. The Glass Jar, dedicated to Vivian Smith, ...

    In other poems the fading or dispersal of light can signal a movement into the past, as in 'The Violets' when the onset of twilight triggers the memories of the poet's childhood. In 'Alter Ego', 'light's lingering tones disperse' to allow the poet to remember the first time she experienced the power of love.

  1. Poetry analysis of 'Country School' Allen Curnow

    The idea that the school started along with the persona himself brings into notice that the school might not be as old as one would think. Also 'you call it old' further suggests that the persona is merely just referring to the school as being 'old' when actually its not.

  2. Making close references to language, imagery and form, consider the ways Owen presents and ...

    in the war just burns away any feelings, and gives the idea that it really is a painful and violent act which means that the soldiers literally cannot afford to let their emotions through. I think that because of this, even though in general the poem is quite distant, the

  1. Compare and Contrast James Joyce & Charles Dickens

    Dickens in contrast is the reverse; he employs a much more coherent narrative, which flows with descriptive tone, encompassing formal language on the whole, and so non-colloquial. The final paragraph highlights this by being one long sentence when Dickens writes about the environment surrounding Pip, the tone turns almost mournful,

  2. How does Coleridge tell the story in part 4 of Rime of the Ancient ...

    Indeed, in the 12th stanza, we see that the Mariner?s appreciation of nature is able to distract him from his strong feelings of guilt, ?the water-snakes?moved in tracks of shining white?. The word, ?tracks?, creates a contrast with the directionless mariner, he has been unable to connect with God and

  1. How does Coleridge tell the story in part 1 of Rime of the Ancient ...

    The use of assonance, ?wondrous cold?, and short clauses forces the reader to pause and slow down, hindering the pace of the stanza, and therefore creating a contrast between the previous fast-moving and chaotic stanzas. The simile, ?ice?as green as emerald?, marks the beginning of the Mariner and his ship?s

  2. Convergence of the Twain Analysis

    Fate bring these ?two hemispheres? together to witness the result of their vanity and recognize that there is a higher power that is ?fashioning? the world?s events, and because of all of the things that have occurred in his

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work