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Romeo and Juliet Letter to Prince Escalus from Friar Laurence.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet Letter to Prince Escalus from Friar Laurence. Dear Prince Escalus, I need to explain to thee of mine actions concerning Romeo and Juliet. As you yourself must understand the feud between the Montague's and Capulet's hath been going on for too long. Mine intentions were good and I did not expect them to lead to such a tragedy. Juliet told me that she couldn't marry Paris even though her family wished it. His wealth didn't interest her because she didn't love him. When Romeo and Juliet met, they fell in love straight away. Even though their families were deadly enemies they married in secret. ...read more.

Middle

I cameth up with a plan to free Juliet. 'To rid her from this second marriage, or in my cell there would she kill herself.' As thou knowest I hath researched the powers of herbs and I made a potion that would enable Juliet to sleep temporarily. Mine plan was for Juliet to be pronounced dead so that she didn't have to marry Paris, then wake up to be with Romeo. 'Take thou this vial, being then in bed, and this distilled liquor drink though off.' I knew that I was taking a risk because I couldn't be sure what would happen to Juliet when she was unconscious but she was so unhappy, I had to help her. ...read more.

Conclusion

Romeo knew he couldn't live without his Juliet and he also drank his poison. I tried to get to Romeo to tell him of the plan but I was too late. When Juliet awoke she saw Romeo dead and that was when she killed herself. She kissed Romeo to get up the poison and then stabbed herself with Romeo's dagger. None of this was what I intended, I just wanted to help these people and their families. I know I should hath thought things through more thoroughly but I can't change what hath happened. I know I am to blame and I hath no power. 'I am the greatest, able to do least, Yet most suspected, as the time and place.' I know thou art a man of great power and I hope you can understand what I am telling you. Thou humble servant Friar Laurence ...read more.

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