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Romeo and Juliet - Shakespeare creates in his two lead characters, not merely a love based on physical attraction, but, as his choice of language shows, a meeting of minds and souls. Discuss the dramatic effect of this in your choice of key scenes.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet In the play, Shakespeare creates in his two lead characters, not merely a love based on physical attraction, but, as his choice of language shows, a meeting of minds and souls. Discuss the dramatic effect of this in your choice of key scenes. The play "Romeo and Juliet" was written in the 16th century. It expresses how two "star cross'd lovers" show that their love is merely more than just a physical relationship, as suggested in the spoken language they are "made in heaven" a union? The lovers, Romeo, a Montague and Juliet a Capulet come from "two house holds both alike in dignity" who are powerful feuding families. Both Romeo and Juliet are powerful characters. We first sense Romeo's compelling frustration when Shakespeare uses oxymoron "O brawling love! O loving hate!" this implies that love is a scrap and you are desperately trying to fight against it. The loving hate means that you don't want to fall in love but you cant help it. We discover Juliet's quick wit early in the play. "It is an honour that I dream not of." This conveys that Juliet knows exactly what she wants and she will not let anybody influence those ideas. Juliet also shows how she can sophistically answer people in a polite manor and not in the typical teenage language. The quote "For saints have hand that pilgrims hands do touch," suggests that the language rapidly becomes similar culminating in the beginning. ...read more.

Middle

When the dance is over, he will note where she is, then make his way to her and touch her hand. "I'll watch her place of stand, and, touching hers, make my rude hand." Romeo's speech is a iambic pentameter and it in 5pairs of rhyming couplets: O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear: Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear! So shows a snowy dove trooping for crows, As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows. The measure done, I'll watch her place of stand, And, touching hers, make blessed my rude hand. Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night. This poetic speech would have been a grand example of his social position and high breeding, which Elizabethans would understand and appreciate the poetry. During lines 92 - 109 Romeo and Juliet play the game of blending together and using poetry to portray this. With Tybalt's threat still echoing in our ears, we now see Romeo holding Juliet's hand and wittily offering to kiss it. He says, "If I profane with my unworthiest hand..." Romeo sounds sharp, but he's not. The popular love poetry of the time often portrayed the lover as one who worshipped his beloved with religious devotion. Romeo is willing to pay the penalty ("fine") for touching Juliet's hand ("this holy shrine") by kissing it. ...read more.

Conclusion

Juliet uses opposites and Romeo starts his replies with personification. Juliet: "Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day: It was the nightingale, and not the lark, That pierc'd the fearful hollow of thine ear; Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate tree: Believe me, love, it was the nightingale. Romeo: It was the lark, the herald of the morn, No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east. Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops. I must be gone and live, or stay and die. These two quotes show the personification and opposites used by the two lovers. The language is very poetic and has a slight rhythm to it. This allows flow to the language. On the other hand as this section enfolds their language becomes close. The audience can see that Juliet intends to carry on and to compare the music to represent them parting. Their division, which is sweet and the fate, that is to tear them apart. "some say the lark makes sweet division this doth not so, for she divideth both." As fate compels the two "star cross'd lovers" they are never to meet again in life. Romeo and Juliet's parents are both punished by their beloved children's death. Yet, fate is seen as a double punishment: through their very words Romeo and Juliet are evidently a perfect union. "Some shall be pardon'd and some punished for never was a story of more woe than this of Romeo and Juliet" 1 ...read more.

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