• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Scene VI in Tennessee Williams A Streetcar named Desire is very important to the view that the audience have of Blanche DuBois.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Scene 6 Prep Scene VI in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar named Desire is very important to the view that the audience have of Blanche DuBois. The scene shows the side of her character that may detract from the sympathy that the audience have for her but also an incredibly touching account of the death of her husband which creates a great deal of pity from the audience. Williams utilises the light and polka music to create a degree of sympathy but also the dramatic manner in which Blanche expresses her feelings can portray to the audience what she has been through and create an air of sympathy for her. The main item in scene VI that creates sympathy for Blanche is the account of the death of her husband. At the beginning of the description, the audience will know that Blanche will have difficulty expressing what she is trying to say due to the fact that she cannot make eye contact with Mitch whom she is talking to; "[She crosses to the window and sits on the sill, looking out.]" This creates a more reflective atmosphere in the scene and immediately changes the way the audience sees Blanche as opposed to earlier in the ...read more.

Middle

Blanche's actual account of the death of her husband is another factor that engages audience sympathy for her. The dramatic manner in which she describes the horrific event causes the audience to get a reconstruction as close to the reality as is necessary to understand Blanche more than earlier in the play; "all ran and gathered about the terrible thing at the edge of the lake!" The fact that she refers to her husband as a 'terrible thing' suggests that he is no longer human to her and portrays to the audience some degree of the horror that Blanche experienced during this instance. In this description the audience also learns that Blanche blames herself for the death of her husband; "It was because - on the dance-floor - unable to stop myself - I'd suddenly said - 'I know! I know! You disgust me...'" The breaks in Blanche's speech obviously show her sobs as she recounting this event and the audience by now must believe that they are genuine. It was not the fact that he cheated on her that made him kill himself but the fact that Blanche resented him for it that pushed him over the edge. ...read more.

Conclusion

Now however the audience is given a reason why she behaves in such a way. It is that she was never just looking for desire but she was in search of attention and love ever since her husband has died. This is perhaps to make her forget about her husband and the fact that now that he is dead he will not age and while she is alive, she will. This is also an explanation for the fact that she is always conscious of her age as she knows that her memories of her husband will be of him as a young man, whilst in the meantime she is always getting older. Scene VI is highly successful in shifting the sympathy of the audience towards Blanche as it gives a perspective of Blanche that is different than the previous scenes. The use of light and music as well as the dramatic way that Blanche retells her husband's death are all devices used to create sympathy. These devices should be successful in the creation of sympathy for Blanche as they highlight areas that may detract from sympathy and explain why she behaves in this manner. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level A Street Car Named Desire section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level A Street Car Named Desire essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To what extent can Blanche Dubois be considered a tragic hero?

    5 star(s)

    The scene creates a sense of foreboding that all may not be as it seems and that Elysian Fields may be the end of the line for Blanche. The audience's sympathy is aroused as Williams' imbues the opening scene with incongruity and a touch of irony - Blanche's confusion is apparent.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    How does Williams present the character of Blanche in scenes 1-3 of A Streetcar ...

    4 star(s)

    Stanley 'pulls open the wardrobe trunk standing in the middle of the room' that contains Blanche's possessions: 'What is these here? Fox-pieces! ...Where are your white fox-pieces...And what have we here? The treasure chest of a pirate! ...Where are your pearls and gold bracelets?

  1. Peer reviewed

    To what extent can Blanche Dubois be described as a tragic victim in A ...

    4 star(s)

    Blanche 'must avoid a strong light', to escape from reality, so she covers the naked light bulb with a Chinese paper lantern, symbolising her longing for 'magic'. The lantern relates to a moth being drawn to the flame of desire.

  2. A Streetcar Named Desire - scenes 2 and 3 reviewed.

    * * * * * SCENE 3 * [There is a picture of Van Gogh's] - He suffered from insanity. The picture hanging on their wall is a very well known picture. It has animals it dogs playing poker, therefore it relates to what is happening in the book.

  1. Streetcar named Desire: dramatic tension

    Together they share a conversation on death and loneliness: Mitch: " The girl's dead now. Blanche: (In a tone of sympathy) "Oh!" Mitch: "She knew she was dying when she gave me this. A very strange girl, very sweet - very! Blanche: "She must have been very fond of you.

  2. How far do the Kowalskis and the DuBois different notions lead to a tragic ...

    Stanley about her man "from Dallas", showing her incapability of being honest and wish to live in her fantasy world, which Stanley destroys. It is when Stanley's world is insulted and threatened by Blanche which leads to even Stella calling him "Drunk - drunk - animal thing, you!"

  1. A streetcar named desire - Exploration notes context/structure/language/plot&subplot/visual aural spatial.

    Visual effects * Costume - the costume that is described in the stage directions is very important in order to portray the characters as well as the themes. The men's costumes are basic and unadorned, as also reflected in the language and in their personalities.

  2. What impression of Blanche is created in the first scene of A Streetcar named ...

    Blanche behaves very haughtily in the scene, and through the use of condescending language, and unsubtle hints ("id like to be left alone"), managed to offend, and therefore get rid of Eunice. This disassociation she wishes to have with Eunice not only portrays blanche in a haughty light, but also

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work