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She is vital to her husband: in losing her, he loses himself. By exploring ways in which relationship between Desdemona and Othello is presented evaluate this view.

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Introduction

"She is vital to her husband: in losing her, he loses himself." By exploring ways in which relationship between Desdemona and Othello is presented evaluate this view. Shakespeare's tragedy depicts the downfall of the moor Othello, who falls from honour due to the 'honest Iago's' manipulation. Like any Shakespearean tragedy, the play starts off at what scholar 'Christopher Brooker' calls the 'dream stage', where after some conflict with Desdemona's father, Brabantio, Othello and his 'sweet Desdemona' are free to share their love to the world. Everything is joyous and the relationship between the two flourishes with love. In the context of a tragedy, the major character will have a serious flaw which leads to their downfall, and in Othello, it is the fact that he is extremely jealous and gullible. It does not take much for Othello the 'jealous booby' as Rhymer calls him, to have his own thoughts turned. ...read more.

Middle

Othello the 'valiant moor' with Desdemona behind him is strong, noble and confident. He stands up to Brabantio, and is a decorated war hero, he is proud of his good name' so much so that he's described as 'egotistical' by F.R Leavis. The couple support one another, in the confrontation with Brabantio, Othello asks for Desdemona to be fetched so she can 'speak of him before her father' when Desdemona arrives, she convinces her Father to 'give thee that' will all his heart. It is again, interesting that once Iago is in Othello's ear, he forgets this instance of loyalty; in fact instead of seeing Desdemona as loyal because of it, he uses it as a point against her after Iago suggests that she was willing to be disloyal to her own father, so she is likely to be disloyal to him. As Ania Loomba puts, Desdemona passes from being Othello's 'ally who would guarantee his white status' to his 'sexual and racial other' when he sees her as an adulteress. ...read more.

Conclusion

a weak character who fears her husband's wrath, she could have stopped her death if she had admitted she lost the handkerchief, nonetheless it is obvious she is a good and 'obedient' wife, at the end of the play we see Othello is nothing without her. Finally, Othello loses himself without Desdemona in the way he speaks. The confident Othello we see at the start of the play speaks in verse; he is coherent as speaks in iambic pentameter, in Shakespeare's play, only the upperclass characters speak like this, while the lowerclass characters speak in prose. Othello speaks in an incoherent prose at the end of the play, after he loses Desdemona by killing her; he loses this sense of articulacy 'OhBlood! Blood! Blood!.. Goats and monkeys'. Desdemona is vital to her husband's confidence in himself and reputation, without her he becomes what society expects him to be, a black ram not who doesn't fit with the white upper-class of venetian society he desires. Ameer Patel, Ms Steele. ...read more.

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    Explore the ways in which Iago destroys the relationship between Desdemona and Othello

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