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Slavery: A Recipe for Failure

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Introduction

Lauren Sprouse English - B Block 1/11/01 Slavery: A Recipe for Failure Just as slavery binds slaves to their masters, it also binds masters to a static way of life. This is evidenced by the fact that slaveholders must keep their slaves significantly oppressed with no positive examples of freedom. As shown in A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, masters hold slaves down so they can never improve their lot in life, and slavery as an institution can never progress. ...read more.

Middle

By doing this, masters make absolutely sure their slaves will not entertain the ideas of freedom that instill the greatest fear in any master's heart. Furthermore, slaves are kept ignorant in order for their masters to keep supremacy over them. When Sophia Auld began to teach Frederick Douglass to read, her husband stopped the instruction at once: "Mr. Auld found out what was going on, and at once forbade Mrs. Auld to instruct me further, telling her, among other things, that it was unlawful, as well as unsafe, to teach a slave to read" (20). ...read more.

Conclusion

Auld dismisses his petition as a covert attempt to escape: "He told me I could go nowhere, but that he could get me, and that in the event of my running away, he should spare no pains in his efforts to catch me" (61). In Frederick Douglass' world, slaves have no rights, freedoms, or liberties, and are said to be bound by the chains of slavery. Over time, slavery is destined for failure because both masters and slaves are bound to keeping the institution constant with no allowance for growth and change. Word Count - 403 1 ...read more.

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